Caption: Inside Technology
Inside Technology 

Dream Jobs 2011: Outside The Cubicle

From: Spectrum Radio
Series: Spectrum Radio
Length: 59:00

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In Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle listeners will hear the stories of three very determined people who struggled to find the career path outside conventional workplaces.

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In Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle listeners will hear the stories of three very determined people who struggled to find the career path outside conventional workplaces.
 
We'll meet:
Loredana BessoneLoredana Bessone who couldn't afford the program and college she wanted and settled on a school close to her home in Italy. Her major, informatics, gave her a range of skills that would eventually equip her to train astronauts in robotics, engineering, software, and behavioral skills they need in space exploration.
 
 
 
Amir Abo-ShaeerAmir Abo-Shaeer who made a radical move quitting a dreary position at a telephone-products company, a job he said was sucking his soul dry. Determined to teach technology to high school students, Abo-Shaeer pioneered a four-year engineering academy inCalifornia, and has won a McArthur "genius" grant for his creative approach to teaching.
 
Loredana BessoneLucie Pautet, who, as a teenager growing up inFrance, wanted to become a rocket scientist but wasn't accepted into aerospace school. Instead she studied underwater acoustics which launched her into a meandering, globe-trotting career as a cable-laying technician and a coastal waters scientist.
 
 
This Labor Day inspire your listeners with
Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle!

Piece Description

In Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle listeners will hear the stories of three very determined people who struggled to find the career path outside conventional workplaces.
 
We'll meet:
Loredana BessoneLoredana Bessone who couldn't afford the program and college she wanted and settled on a school close to her home in Italy. Her major, informatics, gave her a range of skills that would eventually equip her to train astronauts in robotics, engineering, software, and behavioral skills they need in space exploration.
 
 
 
Amir Abo-ShaeerAmir Abo-Shaeer who made a radical move quitting a dreary position at a telephone-products company, a job he said was sucking his soul dry. Determined to teach technology to high school students, Abo-Shaeer pioneered a four-year engineering academy inCalifornia, and has won a McArthur "genius" grant for his creative approach to teaching.
 
Loredana BessoneLucie Pautet, who, as a teenager growing up inFrance, wanted to become a rocket scientist but wasn't accepted into aerospace school. Instead she studied underwater acoustics which launched her into a meandering, globe-trotting career as a cable-laying technician and a coastal waters scientist.
 
 
This Labor Day inspire your listeners with
Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle!

Timing and Cues

Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle

Story Index

Segment A:

Intro: 2:00

Lead: 00:45
Story: Lucie Pautet by Sandra Upson 50 [:20 Amb + 9:55+ :50 water Amb.]

I.D. Out w. bites.

Segment B:
Loredana Bessone by Prachi Patel [ :58 Mux +19:20 + :40]

LEAD: :40

I.D. Out.

Segment C:
Lead: 00:45?
Story: Amir Abo-Shaeer by David Schneider 13:

Sidebar Lead: 00:30?
Sidebar: 2:27

Wrap: 00:45

Rundown:

Billboard/Show Open [00:59]

Anchor: I’m Susan Hassler, and this is “Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle.” We look under the ocean and toward outer space to find people working outside the box.

TAPE: (From Bessone piece at 19:42) I think the world’s too big and too interesting to be stuck in one place. [time :04]

Anchor: Creative people who’ve taken risks to spark their ambitions. One left a secure job to start a high school tech program.

TAPE: (at 12:54 in Abo-Shaeer story) I try to explain to my students that they need to follow their passion. [CUT THIS OUT: And I’ve been explaining this to them for four or five years now,END CUT] that you need to follow your passion, and you will be happy. [time after editing out the middle words :07]

Anchor: His students are energized to work long past classroom hours.

TAPE: (at 10:45 in Abo-Shaeer story) It’s 2 or 3 in the morning and the students are saying, ‘Please let us stay; we’re not done and we really need to finish this one thing before we go.” [time: :07]

Anchor: When the economy’s bad and the job market’s worse you have to think outside the cubicle to find your bliss.

Music up..

Anchor: Dream Jobs. Stay tuned.

MUSIC UP FULL to finish.

Anchor: First, this news.

[05:00 blank for newscasts]

Segment A :06 - :19

:00 - :01 Billboard

:01 - :06 Newscast hole

Program Intro - [00:00]

I’m Susan Hassler, Editor in Chief of IEEE Spectrum Magazine, and this is “Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle.”

TAPE Bring up some kind of mood music under the Intro. And bed music throughout the rest of the Intro.

Are you thinking “dream jobs” – are you kidding? I just want a job, any job. But when the economy is wobbly and unforgiving you need to shake things up. We believe that you can—and should— look past confining walls and boundaries, and find or create satisfying jobs you enjoy. We call the show “Outside the Cubicle” because we’re going to tell you about three very determined people who struggled to find the career path outside conventional workplaces.

We’ll meet Amir Abo-Shaeer, who made a radical move, quitting a dreary position at a telephone-products company, a job he said was sucking his soul dry. Determined to teach technology to high school students, Abo-Shaeer pioneered a four-year engineering academy in California, and has won a McArthur “genius” grant for his creative approach to teaching.

(at 10:52 in Abo-Shaeer story) I’m now much riskier and much more willing to take giant risks and just try anything. Because the only thing that can happen is failure. And failure is just another data point to help you get toward success.’ It’s hard for people to learn that. [time :14]

Another out-of-the-cubicle thinker is Lor-eh-DONna Bess-OWN-eh, who couldn’t afford the program and college she wanted, and settled on a school close to her home in Italy. Her major, informatics, gave her a range of skills that would eventually equip her to train astronauts in robotics, engineering, software, and behavioral skills they need in space exploration.

Now, moving from outer space to the depths of the oceans, we begin with Lucie Poh-TAY, who explores exotic undersea environments. As a teenager growing up in France, Pautet wanted to become a rocket scientist. But she wasn’t accepted into aerospace school, and instead studied underwater acoustics. That launched her into a meandering, globe-trotting career as a cable-laying technician and a coastal waters scientist. Now Poh-TAY is helping to build an ambitious underwater observatory off the west coast of Canada.

Lucie Pautet SXF at top of story come up full before story lead…

ANCHOR LEDE: The crew of scientists and engineers on board the ship the R/V Thomas G. Thompson is exhausted. After a month at sea, they had finally docked on Vancouver Island, and it’s time to go home. With alarms clanging, crewmen bark orders as cranes dangle several tons of equipment overhead. Lucie Pautet is keeping close watch on the hubbub. The 41-year-old engineer has just returned from a trip to Neptune, an underwater observatory that she’s helping to build off the coast of western Canada. Sandra Upson caught up with Pautet minutes after the ship docked.

STORY: [00:20 ambience + 9:55 story + :48 Amb out]


INcue: LP: When you go for a Neptune mission it’s very intense…
OUTcue: …journalists make Lucie Pautet an incomparable engineer. I’m Sandra Upson.

I.D. Out Susan:
Anchor: In our next story we go to the Astronaut Training Center at the European Space Agency near Cologne, Germany.

TAPE: [Loredana Bessone story at 16:24] M4 is nearly dead.

DING CROAK

RR: The mission ends in disaster. [end at 16:30]

Anchor: Disaster comes all too easily. To make space missions successful it takes engineering skills and survival strategies We meet the woman who prepares explorers for the rigors of space.
More Dream Jobs, coming right up.

TAPE: ?

:19 - :20 Station Cut-away

:20 - :40 Segment B

Open segment B, I.D:
Music begins cold, to 00:09 and bed I.D.
Anchor: Welcome back to Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle. I’m Susan Hassler.

Music back up full to 00:15, and fade to bed lead.

STORY: Loredana Bessone Script by Prachi Patel

ANCHOR LEDE:

The United States no longer sends people into space, but the European space agency is collaborating with private industry to develop space technology and even tourism for its 18 member states. Every two years six new brainy, fit, and accomplished recruits enter the flight program at the Astronaut Training Center near Cologne, Germany. Here, they meet their match: Lor-eh-DONna Bess-OWN-eh. (Loredana Bessone.)

Ambience at top of story fades in at end of anchor lead, comes up full to start story.

TAPE:
INcue: SXF. Loredana Bessone is a flinty, red-haired Northern Italian who walks around in teetering snakeskin heels…
OUTcue: For now, though, Loredana Bessone is happy in her dream job. I’m WDJ.
Music Up, to bed Out ID.
[End of segment B, Out-I.D.] 00:10
Susan: More Dream Jobs coming up.

:40 - :41 Station Cut-away

:41 - 59:00 Segment C
Open segment C, I.D.

Susan: Welcome back to Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle. I’m Susan Hassler.

TAPE: Techie music up full, then fade to bed the Anchor Lead.

Story Amir Abo-Shaeer by David Schneider [13:48 + Music]
LEAD:

Amir Abo-Shaeer received a $500,000 MacArthur Foundation “genius award” for his work fostering engineering education. But he’s not doing that at a college or university: He’s the first public high school teacher to receive this prestigious award. A decade ago, Abo-Shaeer created an engineering academy at his alma mater, the Dos Pueblos High School, in Goleta, California. David Schneider visited Abo-Shaeer to find out what inspired him to leave a well-paid job in industry and head into the classroom.

TAPE INcue: DAS: Amir Abo-Shaeer was working in a comfortable job as a mechanical engineer at a telecommunications company. But he wasn’t happy…
OUTcue: DAS: With Amir Abo-Shaeer at Dos Pueblos High School in Goleta, California, I’m David Schneider.

TAPE: Music at end of story comes up full, then fades under sidebar lead.

LEAD, Sidebar:
Although the FIRST Robotics competition is a centerpiece of Abo-Shaeer’s program, only seniors get to compete. The students’ exposure to hand-on learning comes earlier on, though, with more modest projects. Spectrum visited a class where 10th graders were building a simple vehicle from a few common objects. At first glance, the task seemed almost too elementary for high schoolers. But the instructor had cleverly arranged the exercise to give them a taste of the kinds of pressures real engineers face.

TAPE:
INcue: My name is Kevin McKee…

OUTcue: “…You look forward to senior year.”

MUSIC or SXF short transition

Wrap
Show Close/ Wrap
Susan Hassler: You’ve been listening to Dream Jobs: Outside the Cubicle. a production of IEEE Spectrum Magazine.

For transcripts of this program, and expanded stories, check out the IEEE Spectrum website: spectrum.ieee.org.
Our profile of Lor-eh-DONna Bess-OWN-eh was reported by Sally Adee and written by Prachi Patel.

Our thanks to:
And [TAPE: in their own voices] Jean Kumagai, Nancy Hantman, Ramona Gordon, Francesco Ferorelli, Mark Montgomery, Randi Silberman, Sam Moore. Paul Ruest.

Our technical producer is Dennis Foley [FOE-lee]. And our executive producer is Sharon Basco. I’m Susan Hassler.

MUSIC SIGNATURE CLOSE

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

Anchor: Are you thinking “dream jobs” – are you kidding? I just want a job, any job. But when the economy is unforgiving trailblazers shake things up. They look past walls and boundaries, and find or create satisfying jobs. In the next hour “Outside the Cubicle” tells the stories of three determined people who struggled to find unique careers outside conventional workplaces.

We’ll meet Amir Abo-Shy-EAR, who made a daring move, quitting a dreary position at a telephone-products company, a job he said was sucking his soul dry. Eager to teach technology to high school students, Abo- Shy-EAR pioneered a four-year engineering academy in California. He won a McArthur “genius” grant for his creative approach to teaching.

TAPE: (at 10:52 in Abo-Shaeer story) I’m now much riskier and much more willing to take giant risks and just try anything. Because the only thing that can happen is failure. And failure is just another data point to help you get toward success.’ It’s hard for people to learn that. [time :14]

Anchor: Another out-of-the-cubicle thinker is Lor-eh-DONna Bess-OWN-eh, who couldn’t afford the college she wanted, and settled on a school close to her home in Italy. But the range of skills she acquired there, remarkably, equipped her to train astronauts in robotics, engineering, and behavioral techniques needed in space exploration.

Moving from outer space to the depths of the oceans, we begin our program with Lucie Poh-TAY, who explores exotic undersea environments. Growing up in France, Poh-TAY wanted to become a rocket scientist. But she wasn’t accepted into aerospace school, and instead studied underwater acoustics. That launched her career as a coastal waters scientist.

OUTRO:

Show Credits and IDs out with music.

Related Website

http://spectrum.ieee.org/