Caption: Steve Killelea, Creator of the Global Peace Index, Credit: Institute of Economics and Peace
Image by: Institute of Economics and Peace 
Steve Killelea, Creator of the Global Peace Index 

Imagining a Peace Economy (Peace Talks Radio) [59:00/54:00]

From: Good Radio Shows, Inc.
Series: Peace Talks Radio: Hour Long Specials
Length: 58:55

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Conversation with the developers of the Global Peace Index which ranks over 150 nations on a matrix that suggests their peacefulness. Also the story of Afghani women entrepreneurs whose self-started dress-making business helped create some stability in their Taliban-controlled community.

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“Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.” When President Eisenhower warned of the power of the military industrial complex in January 1961, he probably wouldn’t have guessed that the 2012 budget request for defense-related expenditures would be one trillion dollars. While conventional wisdom asserts that war and military spending are good for the economy, a 2007 report by the Center for Economic and Policy Research showed that military spending diverts resources from productive uses, such as consumption and investment, and ultimately slows economic growth and reduces employment. Today on Peace Talks, we’ll explore the relationship between economic development and peace. We’ll talk with two representatives from the Institute for Economics and Peace. Steve Killelea is the founder of the Institute and the creative force behind both the Global Peace Index and the United States Peace Index. Clyde McConaghy, a Board Director for the Institute, has been involved with the development of the Global Peace Index since its inception in 2007. Their annual rankings hope to identify the positive economic impacts of increased levels of peacefulness on a global and regional level. We’ll also talk with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, the New York Times bestselling author of The Dressmaker of Khair Khana --- the true story of the “breadwinners in burqas,” five Afghani sisters who become successful entrepreneurs during the Taliban years. They started a dressmaking business in their living room that offered work to 100 women in the neighborhood. Gayle is also the deputy director of the Women and Foreign Policy program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Piece Description

“Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.” When President Eisenhower warned of the power of the military industrial complex in January 1961, he probably wouldn’t have guessed that the 2012 budget request for defense-related expenditures would be one trillion dollars. While conventional wisdom asserts that war and military spending are good for the economy, a 2007 report by the Center for Economic and Policy Research showed that military spending diverts resources from productive uses, such as consumption and investment, and ultimately slows economic growth and reduces employment. Today on Peace Talks, we’ll explore the relationship between economic development and peace. We’ll talk with two representatives from the Institute for Economics and Peace. Steve Killelea is the founder of the Institute and the creative force behind both the Global Peace Index and the United States Peace Index. Clyde McConaghy, a Board Director for the Institute, has been involved with the development of the Global Peace Index since its inception in 2007. Their annual rankings hope to identify the positive economic impacts of increased levels of peacefulness on a global and regional level. We’ll also talk with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, the New York Times bestselling author of The Dressmaker of Khair Khana --- the true story of the “breadwinners in burqas,” five Afghani sisters who become successful entrepreneurs during the Taliban years. They started a dressmaking business in their living room that offered work to 100 women in the neighborhood. Gayle is also the deputy director of the Women and Foreign Policy program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Timing and Cues

59:00 Version Version

59:00 Version

00:00:00 - 00:00:59 - Open Billboard

00:01:00 - 00:23:14 - Part A - ends with :59 music bed for local anncts.

00:23:15 - 00:41:08 - Part B - ends with :59 music break for local anncts.

00:41:09 - 00:59:00 - Part C

54:00 Version Version

54:00 Version

00:00:00 - 00:00:59 - Open Billboard

00:01:00 - 00:05:59 - Your Newscast

00:06:00 - 00:26:08 - Part A - ends with :59 music bed for local anncts.

00:26:09 - 00:41:00 - Part B - ends with :59 music break for local anncts.

00:41:00 - 00:59:00 - Part C

Related Website

http://www.peacetalksradio.com