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Playwright Finds Voice in Congo

From: PBS Women, War & Peace Podcast
Length: 06:46

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Playwright and activist Lynn Nottage explains how after interviewing survivors of Congo's civil war in 2004, she was inspired to write "Ruined," which earned her a Pulitzer Prize. Mixing "passion, purpose and art," Nottage hopes the play will impact people long after curtain-down. Read the full description.

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Welcome to Women, War & Peace’s podcast series with our host, Amy Costello. Each week, Amy will be talking to people who have responded creatively to the plight of women living in conflict zones.

This week playwright and activist Lynn Nottage explains how learning about Congo’s sexual and colonial devastation moved her to action. After interviewing survivors of Congo’s civil war in 2004, she was inspired to write Ruined, an acclaimed play that centers on Mama Nadi, “a shrewd businesswoman in a land torn apart by civil war.” Ruined won a 2009 Pulitzer Prize and is now being staged at the La Jolla Playhouse in San Francisco.

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Piece Description

Welcome to Women, War & Peace’s podcast series with our host, Amy Costello. Each week, Amy will be talking to people who have responded creatively to the plight of women living in conflict zones.

This week playwright and activist Lynn Nottage explains how learning about Congo’s sexual and colonial devastation moved her to action. After interviewing survivors of Congo’s civil war in 2004, she was inspired to write Ruined, an acclaimed play that centers on Mama Nadi, “a shrewd businesswoman in a land torn apart by civil war.” Ruined won a 2009 Pulitzer Prize and is now being staged at the La Jolla Playhouse in San Francisco.

Related Website

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/women-war-and-peace/podcast/podcast-art-from-the-ashes-of-ruin/