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GNP 007 (Full Hour) Emmanuel Jal and Spleen Sandwiches

From: World Vision Report
Series: World Vision Report - Weekly One Hour
Length: 01:50:25

Violence against women is commonplace in Afghanistan. It takes all forms: domestic abuse, forced marriage, rape, even honor killings. This week, the World Vision Report visits a women’s shelter in Kabul where women of all ages come for comfort and guidance. We also cut wood in Nepal, discuss the music of Emanuel Jal, and taste test a Mexican culinary tradition -- flowers in your food. It’s a tasty treat – on this week’s show from the Global News Partnership. Read the full description.

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On this week’s show...

  • A women’s center in Kabul attracts all ages
  • Male Midwives meet a need in Liberia
  • Farming dilemma -- grow crops for food or fuel
  • A farm in Indonesia that’s also a school
  • Cutting wood for a living in Nepal
  • Flowers to eat in Mexico
  • The music of Emanuel Jal
  • Treat from Sicily: Spleen sandwich

 

Family Guidance (4:20)

In Afghanistan, violence against women and girls is widespread.  The violence takes all forms:  domestic abuse, forced marriage, rape, and honor killings.  Now an organization called Women for Afghan Women has set up a family guidance center in Kabul.It’s become a haven for women of all ages…even lovelorn teenage girls.  Will Everett reports.

 

Male Midwives (5:53)

Becoming pregnant and giving birth is one of the most dangerous things a woman can do in Liberia.  According to UNICEF, women there have a one in 12 lifetime risk of dying from it.  Most of those deaths could be prevented with access to trained midwives, but there’s a dire shortage of them in the country.  Recently, a school for midwives in a remote corner of the country decided to break from tradition and try something new to meet the demand.  Bonnie Allen reports.

 

Bio-Fuels (6:03)

Until fairly recently, corn came on a cob and was eaten for dinner.  Or it was pulverized and made into tortillas or cereal and consumed across the developing world.  But more and more, farmers are growing corn for the production of ethanol.  Ethanol is a bio-fuel that can be used in cars instead of the usual fossil fuels that contribute to climate change.  So it seems obvious that bio-fuels are good for the globe.  Not so, says ActionAid. The anti-poverty agency recently released a report saying the use of bio-fuels could be disastrous for developing countries.  Business Week writer Roben Farzad joins Peggy Wehmeyer to sort through the issues.  He says the food versus fuel debate intensified a couple of years ago when the cost of oil skyrocketed, and more people became interested in corn-based ethanol.

 

Learning Farm (5:15)

Being “green” is quite fashionable these days.  There’s organic food, organic clothing – even organic soap powder.  More and more people are adapting their behavior – and their businesses – to go green.  But an organic farm in Indonesia is doing more than saving the environment.

It’s saving street kids at the same time.  Solenn Honorine reports from West Java, Indonesia.

 

 

Woodcutting Trip (4:03)

In the village of Kaskikot, Nepal, a gas stove is no longer an oddity. Many people have them these days.  But with oil both scarce and expensive, fire is still the best way to cook and stay warm.  Reporter Laura Spero has spent the last seven years traveling to Kaskikot, living with a woman she calls Aamaa, or mother.  It’s Aamaa who lights the fire each morning and makes sure the rice cooks over it twice a day.  That’s a lot of firewood, and someone’s got to bring it from somewhere.  Laura recently accompanied Aamaa and a crowd of neighbors to gather wood in the forest.  She sent this reporter’s notebook from Nepal.

 

Flowers (4:14)

In the United States, it’s traditional to put a bouquet of flowers on the dinner table, but we don’t think of eating those flowers.  Not so in Mexico where you’re almost as likely to find flowers in the food as on the table.  As Mary Stucky reports, Mexicans have been cooking with flowers – and eating them -- for centuries.

 

Emanuel Jal (7:30)

Singer Emmanuel Jal is one of the lost boys of Sudan. He was lucky to be adopted by a woman who, he says, saved his life.  She died in a car accident not too long after adopting him, but she set him on a course that changed his life profoundly.  Peggy Wehmeyer spoke with our global guide to all things music, Ish Mafundikwa, about Emmanuel Jal and his amazing life story.

 

Spleen Sandwich (3:46)

In Sicily’s capitol, Palermo, fast food is available on nearly every corner with nary a golden arch in sight.  Sicilians devour what they call street food at affordable prices for a population that’s struggling to get by.  One in every three Sicilians lives below the poverty level.  Many fill their bellies with chickpea fritters, fried rice balls, and even spleen sandwiches.  Nancy Greenleese went in search of the internal organ snack. 

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Piece Description


On this week’s show...

  • A women’s center in Kabul attracts all ages
  • Male Midwives meet a need in Liberia
  • Farming dilemma -- grow crops for food or fuel
  • A farm in Indonesia that’s also a school
  • Cutting wood for a living in Nepal
  • Flowers to eat in Mexico
  • The music of Emanuel Jal
  • Treat from Sicily: Spleen sandwich

 

Family Guidance (4:20)

In Afghanistan, violence against women and girls is widespread.  The violence takes all forms:  domestic abuse, forced marriage, rape, and honor killings.  Now an organization called Women for Afghan Women has set up a family guidance center in Kabul.It’s become a haven for women of all ages…even lovelorn teenage girls.  Will Everett reports.

 

Male Midwives (5:53)

Becoming pregnant and giving birth is one of the most dangerous things a woman can do in Liberia.  According to UNICEF, women there have a one in 12 lifetime risk of dying from it.  Most of those deaths could be prevented with access to trained midwives, but there’s a dire shortage of them in the country.  Recently, a school for midwives in a remote corner of the country decided to break from tradition and try something new to meet the demand.  Bonnie Allen reports.

 

Bio-Fuels (6:03)

Until fairly recently, corn came on a cob and was eaten for dinner.  Or it was pulverized and made into tortillas or cereal and consumed across the developing world.  But more and more, farmers are growing corn for the production of ethanol.  Ethanol is a bio-fuel that can be used in cars instead of the usual fossil fuels that contribute to climate change.  So it seems obvious that bio-fuels are good for the globe.  Not so, says ActionAid. The anti-poverty agency recently released a report saying the use of bio-fuels could be disastrous for developing countries.  Business Week writer Roben Farzad joins Peggy Wehmeyer to sort through the issues.  He says the food versus fuel debate intensified a couple of years ago when the cost of oil skyrocketed, and more people became interested in corn-based ethanol.

 

Learning Farm (5:15)

Being “green” is quite fashionable these days.  There’s organic food, organic clothing – even organic soap powder.  More and more people are adapting their behavior – and their businesses – to go green.  But an organic farm in Indonesia is doing more than saving the environment.

It’s saving street kids at the same time.  Solenn Honorine reports from West Java, Indonesia.

 

 

Woodcutting Trip (4:03)

In the village of Kaskikot, Nepal, a gas stove is no longer an oddity. Many people have them these days.  But with oil both scarce and expensive, fire is still the best way to cook and stay warm.  Reporter Laura Spero has spent the last seven years traveling to Kaskikot, living with a woman she calls Aamaa, or mother.  It’s Aamaa who lights the fire each morning and makes sure the rice cooks over it twice a day.  That’s a lot of firewood, and someone’s got to bring it from somewhere.  Laura recently accompanied Aamaa and a crowd of neighbors to gather wood in the forest.  She sent this reporter’s notebook from Nepal.

 

Flowers (4:14)

In the United States, it’s traditional to put a bouquet of flowers on the dinner table, but we don’t think of eating those flowers.  Not so in Mexico where you’re almost as likely to find flowers in the food as on the table.  As Mary Stucky reports, Mexicans have been cooking with flowers – and eating them -- for centuries.

 

Emanuel Jal (7:30)

Singer Emmanuel Jal is one of the lost boys of Sudan. He was lucky to be adopted by a woman who, he says, saved his life.  She died in a car accident not too long after adopting him, but she set him on a course that changed his life profoundly.  Peggy Wehmeyer spoke with our global guide to all things music, Ish Mafundikwa, about Emmanuel Jal and his amazing life story.

 

Spleen Sandwich (3:46)

In Sicily’s capitol, Palermo, fast food is available on nearly every corner with nary a golden arch in sight.  Sicilians devour what they call street food at affordable prices for a population that’s struggling to get by.  One in every three Sicilians lives below the poverty level.  Many fill their bellies with chickpea fritters, fried rice balls, and even spleen sandwiches.  Nancy Greenleese went in search of the internal organ snack. 

Timing and Cues

0:00 - 0:59 - Billboard
1:00 - 5:59 - No Audio
6:00 - 6:29 - Music Bed

Segment A
6:30 - Family Guidance
11:39 - Male Midwives

19:00 - 19:59 - Music Bed

Segment B
20:00 - Bio-Fuels
26:22 - Learning Farm
31:51 - Top of the Pops
32:39 - Woodcutting Trip
37:23 - Globe at a Glance

39:00 - 39:59 - Music Bed

Segment C
40:00 - Flowers
44:57 - Emmanuel Jal
54:07 - Spleen Sanwhich

58:59 - End

Additional Files

Related Website

http://globalnewspartnership.com/