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GNP Half Hour #1--Western Union and Tamales

From: World Vision Report
Series: World Vision Report - Weekly Half Hour
Length: 28:00

Many families in Africa go without medical care or prescriptions because they don’t have the money. Now residents of Senegal can purchase micro-insurance. For $2.50 a month, it covers 70% of hospital and doctor costs. That story, the transformation of Western Union, tamale making in Guatemala, and guerilla hideout tours in Indonesia… It’s all coming up this week from the Global News Partnership (formerly the World Vision Report). For air on the week of May 14, 2011.

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On this week’s show…………..

Micro-insurance makes a difference in Africa…photographing Mexican migration… Western Union moves money…making tamales in Guatemala…and touring guerilla hideouts in Indonesia.  Those stories and more -- this week.

Coop Health Insurance (3:57)

The vast majority of people in Africa have no health insurance.  Many families just do without medical care or prescriptions because they don’t have the money.  If a major illness or childbirth occurs, families have to beg relatives, friends, and neighbors to cover the expense.  Jordan Davis reports from Dakar, Senegal on a program that provides micro-insurance to families.  For $2.50 a month, it covers 70% of hospital and doctor costs.  It’s a stripped down version of an HMO in the U.S. and it’s giving a lot of families in Senegal peace of mind when it comes to medical matters.  Jordan Davis reports.

 

Migration Photos (3:56)

The Rockefeller Foundation funded a project in the small village of Monte Blanco, Mexico where nine women were asked to photograph images of migration.  In all the photos, there’s sadness: old people or kids sitting alone.  Discarded toys.  Empty streets.

Even family gatherings have no young people in them.  That’s because 30% of the population -- mostly young men and women -- have left the village in search of work in the US or the cities of northern Mexico.  Conrad Fox reports one of the photographers now wants to become a journalist, but that means migrating to northern Mexico or the U.S. to earn enough money to go to college.

 

Western Union (4:51)

When telegrams became a piece of history, Western Union almost went out of business.  Now, it’s worth billions because Western Union is the largest money transfer system in the world.  New York Times reporter Jason DeParle talks with host Peggy Wehmeyer about the transformation of Western Union which has more offices around the world than McDonalds, Wal-Mart, Starbucks, and Burger King combined.

 

Tamale Maker (3:19)

“What’s Cooking?” this week on the World Vision Report are tamales made in Guatemala.  Reporter Amelia Shaw takes us into the kitchen of Melitza Deleon, a cooking instructor in Antigua who teaches how to cook Mayan recipes that have survived for thousands of years.

 

Guerilla Tours (5:30)

There’s an unusual tourism service in Ache, Indonesia.  It takes visitors to jungle hideouts used by rebel soldiers during Indonesia’s almost three-decade long civil war.  The tour guides are former rebels.  Reporter Chad Bouchard hacks his way through the jungle to give us a taste of a most unusual tourist attraction.

 

 

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Piece Description


On this week’s show…………..

Micro-insurance makes a difference in Africa…photographing Mexican migration… Western Union moves money…making tamales in Guatemala…and touring guerilla hideouts in Indonesia.  Those stories and more -- this week.

Coop Health Insurance (3:57)

The vast majority of people in Africa have no health insurance.  Many families just do without medical care or prescriptions because they don’t have the money.  If a major illness or childbirth occurs, families have to beg relatives, friends, and neighbors to cover the expense.  Jordan Davis reports from Dakar, Senegal on a program that provides micro-insurance to families.  For $2.50 a month, it covers 70% of hospital and doctor costs.  It’s a stripped down version of an HMO in the U.S. and it’s giving a lot of families in Senegal peace of mind when it comes to medical matters.  Jordan Davis reports.

 

Migration Photos (3:56)

The Rockefeller Foundation funded a project in the small village of Monte Blanco, Mexico where nine women were asked to photograph images of migration.  In all the photos, there’s sadness: old people or kids sitting alone.  Discarded toys.  Empty streets.

Even family gatherings have no young people in them.  That’s because 30% of the population -- mostly young men and women -- have left the village in search of work in the US or the cities of northern Mexico.  Conrad Fox reports one of the photographers now wants to become a journalist, but that means migrating to northern Mexico or the U.S. to earn enough money to go to college.

 

Western Union (4:51)

When telegrams became a piece of history, Western Union almost went out of business.  Now, it’s worth billions because Western Union is the largest money transfer system in the world.  New York Times reporter Jason DeParle talks with host Peggy Wehmeyer about the transformation of Western Union which has more offices around the world than McDonalds, Wal-Mart, Starbucks, and Burger King combined.

 

Tamale Maker (3:19)

“What’s Cooking?” this week on the World Vision Report are tamales made in Guatemala.  Reporter Amelia Shaw takes us into the kitchen of Melitza Deleon, a cooking instructor in Antigua who teaches how to cook Mayan recipes that have survived for thousands of years.

 

Guerilla Tours (5:30)

There’s an unusual tourism service in Ache, Indonesia.  It takes visitors to jungle hideouts used by rebel soldiers during Indonesia’s almost three-decade long civil war.  The tour guides are former rebels.  Reporter Chad Bouchard hacks his way through the jungle to give us a taste of a most unusual tourist attraction.