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A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times

From: Richard Paul
Length: 54:10

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Dramatization - largest mass-escape of slaves in Amer history - PROMOS ATTACHED

Smallsouthern_small Hear the first person accounts of people who lived in slavery; the voices of those who worked to end slavery and those who strove to keep it in "A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times." In this special designed for African American History Month, listeners will hear of one family's role in one of the largest mass escapes of slaves in American history. "A Small Southern Town" combines dramatic readings of first person accounts from slave times with modern day analysis to shed light on little known aspects of slave life and slave times in the Nation's Capital. ----------------------------------------- Richard Paul offers these suggestions for reading on subjects covered in his two-part program on slavery: * Arguing About Slavery, by William Lee Miller. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, c. 1996. Available at bookstores. * Personal Memoir of Daniel Drayton: For Four Years and Four Months A Prisoner (For Chairty's Sake) In Washington Jail including A Narrative Of the Voyage and Capture Of The Schooner Pearl. Published by Negro Universities Press, c. 1855. Available at the DC Historical Society. * Fugitives of the Pearl, by John Paynter. Published by Associated Publishers, Inc., Washington, DC, c. 1930. Available at the DC Historical Society. * The Life of Josiah Henson, Formally a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, by Josiah Henson, c. 1849. Available at the Montgomery County Historical Society. Newspaper Articles * "Uncle Tom's Montgomery County Cabin" by Michael Richman, The Washington Post, Wednesday December 10, 1997; Horizon section; Pg. H05 * "Escape on the Pearl: Years Before the Civil War, 77 Washington Slaves Made a Risky Bid for Freedom" by Mary Kay Ricks, The Washington Post, Wednesday August 12, 1998; Horizon section; pg. H01

Piece Description

Hear the first person accounts of people who lived in slavery; the voices of those who worked to end slavery and those who strove to keep it in "A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times." In this special designed for African American History Month, listeners will hear of one family's role in one of the largest mass escapes of slaves in American history. "A Small Southern Town" combines dramatic readings of first person accounts from slave times with modern day analysis to shed light on little known aspects of slave life and slave times in the Nation's Capital. ----------------------------------------- Richard Paul offers these suggestions for reading on subjects covered in his two-part program on slavery: * Arguing About Slavery, by William Lee Miller. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, c. 1996. Available at bookstores. * Personal Memoir of Daniel Drayton: For Four Years and Four Months A Prisoner (For Chairty's Sake) In Washington Jail including A Narrative Of the Voyage and Capture Of The Schooner Pearl. Published by Negro Universities Press, c. 1855. Available at the DC Historical Society. * Fugitives of the Pearl, by John Paynter. Published by Associated Publishers, Inc., Washington, DC, c. 1930. Available at the DC Historical Society. * The Life of Josiah Henson, Formally a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, by Josiah Henson, c. 1849. Available at the Montgomery County Historical Society. Newspaper Articles * "Uncle Tom's Montgomery County Cabin" by Michael Richman, The Washington Post, Wednesday December 10, 1997; Horizon section; Pg. H05 * "Escape on the Pearl: Years Before the Civil War, 77 Washington Slaves Made a Risky Bid for Freedom" by Mary Kay Ricks, The Washington Post, Wednesday August 12, 1998; Horizon section; pg. H01

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Informative

Very well done.

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Review of A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times

This program was so awe-inspiring. So much more than dramtic readings. It truly gave you a personal feeling of what truly went on in slavery times in OUR OWN BACKYARD. A must add to your programming for anytime of the year.

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Review of A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times

A well-crafted example of using a personal account to present an historical event with broader overtones in an engaging, infomational manner.

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Transcript

From W-A-M-U at American University in Washington, this is ?A Small Southern Town: The Nation?s Capitol In Slave Times.? I?m Richard Paul. In this program ... one family?s break for freedom in the Escape To The Pearl.

When they teach you American history in school, there?s always a heavy emphasis on ?Mass?
movements ? Revolutions, Wars ... the drive West. What they don?t usually focus on though is that each mass movement begins, ends and is sustained by INDIVIDUAL choices. Will I be better off as an British subject? Should I risk moving West? Should OUR family remain slaves? It?s that final choice we?re going to hear about now ... The story of one Washington family -- The Edmonsons -- who were part of one of the largest recorded mass-escapes of slaves in American history.

The parents were named Paul and Amelia. Paul was a free man. Amelia was a slave. And under the la...
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Timing and Cues

BILLBOARD (60 sec.)
In: (crickets)We're taking ...
OQ: ...After this news. (music fade)

PROGRAM
In: We hold these truths...
OQ: ...I'm Richard Paul. (music fade)

Additional Files

Related Website

http://www.rlpaulproductions.com/doc.html