Caption: PRX default Piece image
PRX default Piece image 

The Panama Canal -- a historic project still vital to world transportation

From: The Infrastructure Show
Length: 33:03

The 25th segment of The Infrastructure Show podcast series; 4-11

Default-piece-image-1 The Panama Canal, begun in 1879 by the French and ultimately completed by the United States between 1904 and 1914, is a 48-mile-long ship canal that crosses the country of Panama, allowing ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It is a key component of the global logistics system, carrying about 15,000 ships each year -- the one-millionth ship transited the Canal in October, 2010. Host Professor Joseph Schofer, Director of Northwestern University's Infrastructure Technology Institute, who just returned from a trip to the Canal, discusses with Co-Host Tom Herman the history of the Canal and the ambitious expansion program currently underway -- scheduled to deliver larger locks and deeper channels by 2014. For more information, see the web-site: www.theinfrastructureshow.com.

To hear the full audio, sign up for a free PRX account or log in.

Piece Description

The Panama Canal, begun in 1879 by the French and ultimately completed by the United States between 1904 and 1914, is a 48-mile-long ship canal that crosses the country of Panama, allowing ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It is a key component of the global logistics system, carrying about 15,000 ships each year -- the one-millionth ship transited the Canal in October, 2010. Host Professor Joseph Schofer, Director of Northwestern University's Infrastructure Technology Institute, who just returned from a trip to the Canal, discusses with Co-Host Tom Herman the history of the Canal and the ambitious expansion program currently underway -- scheduled to deliver larger locks and deeper channels by 2014. For more information, see the web-site: www.theinfrastructureshow.com.