Caption: Students on their graduation day from Montgomery College, a community college in Maryland. Most young Latinos looking for a way up through higher education choose community college, but a lot of them never make it to graduation day. , Credit: Emily Hanford
Image by: Emily Hanford 
Students on their graduation day from Montgomery College, a community college in Maryland. Most young Latinos looking for a way up through higher education choose community college, but a lot of them never make it to graduation day.  

Rising by Degrees

From: American Public Media
Series: American RadioWorks: Focus on Education
Length: 54:00

Young Latinos are the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population, and they are among the least likely to graduate from college. (11/5/2009) Read the full description.

Rising_by_degrees_promo_photo_500_small The United States is facing a dramatic demographic challenge: Young Latinos are the fastest-growing segment of the population, and they are among the least likely to graduate from college. Experts say the future of the American economy is at stake, because higher education is essential in the 21st century economy. "Rising by Degrees" tells the story of Latino students working towards a college degree—and why it’s so hard for them to get what they want.

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Piece Description

The United States is facing a dramatic demographic challenge: Young Latinos are the fastest-growing segment of the population, and they are among the least likely to graduate from college. Experts say the future of the American economy is at stake, because higher education is essential in the 21st century economy. "Rising by Degrees" tells the story of Latino students working towards a college degree—and why it’s so hard for them to get what they want.

Transcript

Transcript

Stephen Smith: From American Public Media, this is an American RadioWorks documentary.

Mario Martinez: Took me a long time to convince myself I need an education

More Latinos are going to college than ever before.

Brad Stewart: They know that this is the chance to make it to the middle class

Thalia Navarrete: Either you stay behind or you keep going. It's the choice you have to make.

But most Latinos who start college never get a degree. And that's a big problem because Latinos are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population. Experts say unless more of them succeed in college, there won't be enough qualified people to do the jobs of the future.

In the coming hour, "Rising by Degrees" from American RadioWorks.

First, this news.

Speaker: Hello, hello, hello…

It's a summer morning and about 200 high school students are packed into an auditorium...
Read the full transcript

Timing and Cues

00:00 - 01:00 (0:59 + :01 silence) Billboard outcue = "first, this news."
01:00 - 06:00 (5:00) NPR News hole, Music Bed.
06:00 - 34:07 (28:07) Part 1; outcue = "American Public Media."
34:07 - 35:07 (0:59 + :01 silence) Music Bed.
35:07 - 59:00 (23:53) Part 2; outcue = "American Public Media."
59:00 - 60:00 (1:00) silence [no silence segment on PRX]

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

Mario Martinez is a young college student. He really wants his degree, and your economic future might depend on whether he succeeds. Here is “Rising by Degrees” – a new American RadioWorks documentary

OUTRO:

Additional Credits

Producer: Emily Hanford Editor: Catherine Winter Executive Editor/Host: Stephen Smith Coordinating Producer: Ellen Guettler Web Producer: Ochen Kaylan Audio Mixing: Craig Thorson Production assistance: Marc Sanchez, Nancy Rosenbaum, Suzanne Pekow and Frankie Barnhill.

Support for this program comes from the Spencer Foundation.

American RadioWorks is supported by the Batten Institute. The research center for global entrepreneurship and innovation at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business. Batteninstitute.org.

Related Website

http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/latino_college/index.html