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Two Zambian girls talk about climate change

From: michal rahfaldt
Series: COP16 Youth Voices from Africa
Length: 03:46

An interview of 17-year old Kapambwe Chanda who speaks with passion and intelligence about the importance of getting youth involved and interested in climate change issues, and what will happen if we do nothing.

Dsc_7064_small Speaking in the biology lab at their Lusaka-based school, 16 year-old Mwangala Mwale interviews her fellow classmate, 17 year-old Kapambwe Chanda, about what climate change means to her. Chanda speaks with humor and intelligence about the need to get youth more interested in these issues, the responsibility of young people to become involved in this pressing issue that they will soon have to take the lead on handling, and how small actions in one's daily life can make a difference. 

This project is a production of Unicef's Unite for Climate and the Children's Radio Foundation.  Unite for Climate is an online community of young people from all around the world working together on Climate Change. Under the umbrella of UNICEF, our goal is to empower all youth in all countries. Unite for Climate will be a participating member at COP16 in Cancun, Mexico and ready to share the knowledge we receive globally with interested youth.  The Children's Radio Foundation  gives young people a voice, connecting and empowering them to contribute to individual and social change. Through the use of radio and other existing low-cost technologies, the CRF creates innovative media content made by and for children. And through equipping them with the necessary skills and tools, the CRF allows young leaders to make their voices heard.  See our websites for more information: www.childrensradiofoundation.org and www.uniteforclimate.org 

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Piece Description

Speaking in the biology lab at their Lusaka-based school, 16 year-old Mwangala Mwale interviews her fellow classmate, 17 year-old Kapambwe Chanda, about what climate change means to her. Chanda speaks with humor and intelligence about the need to get youth more interested in these issues, the responsibility of young people to become involved in this pressing issue that they will soon have to take the lead on handling, and how small actions in one's daily life can make a difference. 

This project is a production of Unicef's Unite for Climate and the Children's Radio Foundation.  Unite for Climate is an online community of young people from all around the world working together on Climate Change. Under the umbrella of UNICEF, our goal is to empower all youth in all countries. Unite for Climate will be a participating member at COP16 in Cancun, Mexico and ready to share the knowledge we receive globally with interested youth.  The Children's Radio Foundation  gives young people a voice, connecting and empowering them to contribute to individual and social change. Through the use of radio and other existing low-cost technologies, the CRF creates innovative media content made by and for children. And through equipping them with the necessary skills and tools, the CRF allows young leaders to make their voices heard.  See our websites for more information: www.childrensradiofoundation.org and www.uniteforclimate.org 

2 Comments Atom Feed

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Hopi High School Radio

This type of topic on climate changes, not only needs to be heard by the general public, but as well heard by the younger generation. We as teens are the next generation and can influence our peers, because this is going to effect us. There is not enough information about climate changes that is being heard by teens. Most teenagers are unaware what global changes are occurring, and how serious this climate change is. What the Zambian girls say is very true, not many teens want to take a glance at what is around them. Most teens say that global climate change is a "bore" to them, and it's very upsetting that they do not want to take an interest in what will effect them. Finding ways to catch their attention, to feed them knowledge, should not be a priority. Teens should be finding ways that will make them want to take a stand to this type of problem. Most teens may seem to look at the change like a tough challenge, but it can be done, with motivation, before any permanent damage is done. If nothing is done with advising people on what's going on, or making an effort to make some changes, we will be extinct. The answers are out there. Just we as teen are too "lazy" to search for them. This was a very interesting piece. Nicely done and well approached with the answers.

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casual conversation & uncommon insight in the biology lab

“Two Zambian girls talk about climate change” captures just what its title implies – a casual conversation about climate, politics, and everyday attitudes in a biology lab in Zambia. This piece benefits immensely from the interviewee Kapambwe Chanda’s perspective and wit. Kampambwe’s emphasis on making climate change an interesting and entertaining issue for young people is enjoyably candid, and complements her argument about youth becoming engaged future leaders well.

Equally as important as Kampambwe’s insight is the editorial decision to foreground these youth voices on their own terms, without any framing or editorializing. I feel this piece, at a lightweight 3:45, is a wonderful example of the radio’s ability to be transportive and poignant & bring us for a moment to often-unheard terrain of a familiar issue.

With that said, the ending is quite abrupt. The sudden introduction of an editorial voice would alter the piece, but it would have been nice to hear some closing comment from the interviewer. Along those lines, the piece is really an interview rather than a ‘talk;’ perhaps we could hear more from Mwangala.

Do take a moment to listen to this wonderful little piece!