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Winona LaDuke

From: American Public Media
Series: The Promised Land
Length: 54:00

Winona LaDuke has spent decades working on issues of renewable energy, health, and environmental justice on northern Minnesota's White Earth Reservation and beyond. Outspoken, engaging, and unflaggingly dedicated, LaDuke introduces host Majora Carter to the pine forests, lakes, and windswept plains of her land. She talks about harnessing wind power, improving nutrition, preserving heritage crops, and a mandate to protect the land inherited from her ancestors. Read the full description.

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Winona LaDuke sums up the dichotomy: “Native peoples are the poorest population in North America, yet our lands are home to a wealth of resources.”

And the two-time Green Party vice presidential candidate and National Women’s Hall of Fame inductee is trying to make the most of those resources. Winona is behind many projects on the White Earth Reservation, including a wind energy project, a biodiesel ice cream truck, and the reservation's first radio station.

Winona LaDuke is founding director of White Earth Land Recovery Project, a nonprofit organization created in 1989 in order to recover land for the Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe) people. She is also program director of Honor the Earth, a national advocacy group encouraging public support and funding for native environmental groups.

 

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Piece Description

Winona LaDuke sums up the dichotomy: “Native peoples are the poorest population in North America, yet our lands are home to a wealth of resources.”

And the two-time Green Party vice presidential candidate and National Women’s Hall of Fame inductee is trying to make the most of those resources. Winona is behind many projects on the White Earth Reservation, including a wind energy project, a biodiesel ice cream truck, and the reservation's first radio station.

Winona LaDuke is founding director of White Earth Land Recovery Project, a nonprofit organization created in 1989 in order to recover land for the Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe) people. She is also program director of Honor the Earth, a national advocacy group encouraging public support and funding for native environmental groups.

 

Timing and Cues

The Promised Land
Episode: Winona LaDuke
TRT 59:00

* Breaks: Two 1:00 minute Station ID Breaks. There is music under the break. *

*Language Alert: Stations should be aware that the phrase “timber nigger,” a derogatory term for a Native American, occurs at running time 52:15 in the broadcast [or at 14:19 within Segment C].*

Billboard: 00:00 - 1:00
Incue: Hi, I'm Majora Carter and this is the Promised Land. During the next hour, we'll travel to the woods of northern Minnesota.
Outcue:…Activist, human whirlwind, and visionary. Coming up on The Promised Land from American Public Media.

News break hole 01:00 - 06:00

Seg A: 06:00 - 23:27
Incue: I'm Majora Carter and welcome to The Promised Land from American Public Media a show about visionaries and leaders…
Outcue:..she's helping local Indian kids eat better and helping the local farm economy at the same time. I'm Majora Carter and this is the Promised Land from American Public Media.

Break One: 23:27 - 24:27

Seg B: 24:27 - 36:56
Incue: Hi, I'm Majora Carter and you're listening to The Promised Land, where visionary leaders are reshaping their communities...
Outcue:…the adorable kids at the Pine Point School at the promised land dot org. I'm Majora Carter. You're listening to the Promised Land from American Public Media.

Break Two: 36:56 - 37:56

Seg C: 37:56 - 59:00
Incue: I'm Majora Carter and this is The Promised Land a show about visionaries who are changing their communities in innovative ways…

*52:15 Language Alert: Stations should be aware that the phrase “timber nigger,” a derogatory term for a Native American, occurs at running time 52:15 in the broadcast [or at 14:19 within Segment C].*

Outcue:…values that contribute to a healthy planet. [American Public Media].

Related Website

http://www.thepromisedland.org