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A Few Reams of Freedom - Noam Chomsky & C.D. Wright

From: Radio Open Source with Christopher Lydon
Length: 58:59

We're talking politics and poetry with Noam Chomsky and C.D. Wright. Noam Chomsky is on an upbeat about American views on war and imperialism, and the razor-sharp poet C.D. Wright makes "a few reams of freedom." Read the full description.

Noam1_small Noam Chomsky is the closest thing we have to Socrates in the American public square--a scathing questioner of virtually every common premise about who we are as Americans and what we're up to in the world. He's on an upbeat, though, about the country's attitudes about war and imperialism.

And then, another inquisitor of the American landscape: the poet C.D. Wright. She says as soon as the Vietnam War started and she "got a hold of Chomsky," she was a goner. C.D. Wright speaks of her own output as "a few reams of freedom." Father was an Arkansas judge and a nearsighted bookworm, like herself. Mother was a court reporter. "Of the choices revealed to me," she has written, "crime and art were the only ones with any real sex appeal."

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Piece Description

Noam Chomsky is the closest thing we have to Socrates in the American public square--a scathing questioner of virtually every common premise about who we are as Americans and what we're up to in the world. He's on an upbeat, though, about the country's attitudes about war and imperialism.

And then, another inquisitor of the American landscape: the poet C.D. Wright. She says as soon as the Vietnam War started and she "got a hold of Chomsky," she was a goner. C.D. Wright speaks of her own output as "a few reams of freedom." Father was an Arkansas judge and a nearsighted bookworm, like herself. Mother was a court reporter. "Of the choices revealed to me," she has written, "crime and art were the only ones with any real sex appeal."