Caption: Bracelets of Grace: The Vietnam War Story of Major Stanley Horne
Bracelets of Grace: The Vietnam War Story of Major Stanley Horne 

Bracelets of Grace: The Vietnam War Story of Major Stanley Horne

From: David Berner
Length: 29:17

It's been 40 years since the very first POW-MIA bracelet was made and distributed. The iconic bracelets had a humble beginning at the height of the Vietnam War. This documentary focuses on the lasting impact of those bracelets told through the story of one U.S. Air Force pilot, Major Stanley Horne. In 1968 his fighter bomber was shot down over North Vietnam and his name was then engraved, like so many others classified as POW or MIA, on metal bracelets distributed to millions. The bracelets were first released in November, 1970. The documentary is available at :29:17 length, at 20:20 length, and as three separate installments. Read the full description.

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In January of 1968 U.S. Air Force Major Stanley Horne was listed as missing-in-action (MIA) after his fighter-bomber was shot down over North Vietnam. Soon afterward his name was one of the many engraved on a POW-MIA bracelet. His story and the stories of those who wore his bracelet, not only contribute to the narrative of the impact of those bracelets, but also to the story of how America struggled with the war and tried to heal from the scars it left behind.

The POW-MIA bracelets of the Vietnam War era made a lasting impression on all those who wore them. Millions of bracelets with the name of a missing or imprisoned soldier were worn on the wrists of family, friends, supporters and critics of the war. It may have been the only item - the only common bond - that crossed the tumultuous political divide. 

BRACELETS OF GRACE: The Vietnam War Story of Major Stanley Horne includes audio from the personal tapes sent back and forth between Southeast Asia and Major Horne’s family in Madison, Wisconsin. It also includes recollections from the young California college students who originated the bracelets, those who wore Major Horne’s bracelet, and those who wrote hundred of letters to the Horne family until the major’s remains were finally recovered in April, 1990, 22 years after his plane was shot down.  

November 11, 2010 is Veterans Day and the 40th anniversary of the POW-MIA bracelets of the Vietnam War.

The documentary is available to broadcast in its entirety or in three installments. 

 

 

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Piece Description

In January of 1968 U.S. Air Force Major Stanley Horne was listed as missing-in-action (MIA) after his fighter-bomber was shot down over North Vietnam. Soon afterward his name was one of the many engraved on a POW-MIA bracelet. His story and the stories of those who wore his bracelet, not only contribute to the narrative of the impact of those bracelets, but also to the story of how America struggled with the war and tried to heal from the scars it left behind.

The POW-MIA bracelets of the Vietnam War era made a lasting impression on all those who wore them. Millions of bracelets with the name of a missing or imprisoned soldier were worn on the wrists of family, friends, supporters and critics of the war. It may have been the only item - the only common bond - that crossed the tumultuous political divide. 

BRACELETS OF GRACE: The Vietnam War Story of Major Stanley Horne includes audio from the personal tapes sent back and forth between Southeast Asia and Major Horne’s family in Madison, Wisconsin. It also includes recollections from the young California college students who originated the bracelets, those who wore Major Horne’s bracelet, and those who wrote hundred of letters to the Horne family until the major’s remains were finally recovered in April, 1990, 22 years after his plane was shot down.  

November 11, 2010 is Veterans Day and the 40th anniversary of the POW-MIA bracelets of the Vietnam War.

The documentary is available to broadcast in its entirety or in three installments. 

 

 

1 Comment Atom Feed

Caption: PRX default User image

Very nice piece

Blending historic recordings with the story of the POW/MIA bracelets was very effective. A perfect addition to our show on Veteran's Day. You can sense that this was a labor of love. Well done.

Timing and Cues

BRACELETS OF GRACE Documentary - 29:15 Outcue: "...on my wrist (laughter)"

BRACELETS OF GRACE (short version) - 20:20 Outcue: "...on my wrist (laughter)"

BRACELETS OF GRACE - Section 1 - 11:55 Outcue: "..about their bracelets."
BRACELETS OF GRACE - Section 2 - 8:50 Outcue: "...never made that call."
BRACELETS OF GRACE - Section 3 - 8:30 Outcue: "...my wrist (laughter)"

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

During the Vietnam War years, millions of Americans wore metal bracelets on their wrists that carried the name of a U.S. soldier listed as a prisoner-of-war or missing-in-action in Southeast Asia. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the POW-MIA bracelets. And although decades have past, many who wore the bracelets then still have them today, holding onto them as reminders of a conflict that divided a country and of the personal tragedy of war.

The bracelets had a profound impact on those who wore them and especially on the families of the soldiers held prisoner or listed as missing-in-action. One of those families was that of U.S. Air Force pilot Major Stanley Horne. David Berner has his story and the story of what some have referred to as the Bracelets of Grace...

OUTRO:

Bracelets of Grace: The Vietnam War Story of Major Stanley Horne was written and independently produced by David Berner.

If you still have a POW-MIA bracelet from the Vietnam War era, or if you wear one of the modern-day bracelets connected to the soldiers from more recent conflicts, visit - braceletsofgrace.blogspot.com - and share the story of your POW-MIA bracelet.

Additional Credits

Archived audio from CBS News, NBC News, ABC News, and BBC News were used in this documentary. The entire work was partially funded by a Faculty Development Grant from Columbia College Chicago.

Related Website

http://braceletsofgrace.blogspot.com/