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HEART-to-HEART Pgm III: Respecting Diversity

From: Claire Schoen
Series: HEART-to-HEART: Caring for the Dying
Length: 01:00:45

Respecting Diversity looks at the influence of culture, race and religion on dying; how the assumptions behind "good end-of-life care" do not necessarily match the needs of people who are not white and middle class.

Photo3diversitysm_small Respecting Diversity is the third in a series of three programs about helping people to live well as they face death. Winner of both the Gracie and Clarion awards for Best Documentary Series. As we face our own death, or that of someone close to us, what we want and what we need depends on who we are. And, in this nation of immigrants, our cultural background, the language we speak, the religion we practice all influence our views on dying. The medical establishment has its own ideas on what a "good death" entails that may be very different and even at odds with what a patient may want. Assumptions and stereotyping on the part of doctors and nurses can result in inadequate care and sometimes even cross the line into discrimination. -- A Chinese immigrant does not want to die at home because his spirit would return, bringing bad luck to the family. -- A young child is used as a translator to tell her grandmother that she has uterine cancer. -- A Latino man relies on a faith healer rather than taking the medications provided by his Western doctor. -- A religious woman feels she does not have to make medical decisions because God will provide the answers. -- A Zuni woman does not want to talk about death at all. -- An African-American woman says that her doctor's decisions about what treatment she will get are based on the color of her skin. These are the issues faced by Americans every day. Solutions are complex and often subtle. While doctors need to understand and respect the values of their patients, patients and families also need to be educated about their rights and options. Communication can be a powerful tool in bridging the gap. As the population ages and many of us confront the passing of parents and loved ones, we need a more thoughtful public conversation about end of life care. Heart-to-Heart raises tough questions and explores some of the answers.

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Piece Description

Respecting Diversity is the third in a series of three programs about helping people to live well as they face death. Winner of both the Gracie and Clarion awards for Best Documentary Series. As we face our own death, or that of someone close to us, what we want and what we need depends on who we are. And, in this nation of immigrants, our cultural background, the language we speak, the religion we practice all influence our views on dying. The medical establishment has its own ideas on what a "good death" entails that may be very different and even at odds with what a patient may want. Assumptions and stereotyping on the part of doctors and nurses can result in inadequate care and sometimes even cross the line into discrimination. -- A Chinese immigrant does not want to die at home because his spirit would return, bringing bad luck to the family. -- A young child is used as a translator to tell her grandmother that she has uterine cancer. -- A Latino man relies on a faith healer rather than taking the medications provided by his Western doctor. -- A religious woman feels she does not have to make medical decisions because God will provide the answers. -- A Zuni woman does not want to talk about death at all. -- An African-American woman says that her doctor's decisions about what treatment she will get are based on the color of her skin. These are the issues faced by Americans every day. Solutions are complex and often subtle. While doctors need to understand and respect the values of their patients, patients and families also need to be educated about their rights and options. Communication can be a powerful tool in bridging the gap. As the population ages and many of us confront the passing of parents and loved ones, we need a more thoughtful public conversation about end of life care. Heart-to-Heart raises tough questions and explores some of the answers.

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Review of HEART-to-HEART Pgm III: Respecting Diversity

Much work has gone into gathering and collating different viewpoints for this thoughtful and engaging programme. In a world where cultural diversity seems to be a sword edge, where even tolerance is constantly being called into question, it’s a good time to think about people from different cultures at the moment when they’re the most vulnerable.
Death comes to us all – this programme is about the way that different people approach it.
I didn’t know that Chinese people don’t want to die at home, or that for the Zuni its best not to talk too directly about approaching death. This programme is full of such tiny but vital insights into different cultures. Recommended.

Broadcast History

HEART-to-HEART: Caring for the Dying has been broadcast on over 150 stations to-date. These include major markets such as: KQED, San Francisco; WBUR, Boston; WBEZ, Chicago and KERA, Dallas. Originally distributed by PRI, the Series is now AVAILABLE TO ALL PUBLIC RADIO STATIONS.

Transcript

HEART-to-HEART Pgm III: Respecting Diversity

INTRODUCTION
" Narration 1: HEART-TO-HEART: CARING FOR THE DYING. FROM PUBLIC RADIO INTERNATIONAL. THIS PROGRAM -- RESPECTING DIVERSITY --- CONSIDERS THE CULTURE CLASH BETWEEN THE KIND OF CARE GIVEN TO THE DYING AND WHAT PEOPLE IN THIS DIVERSE SOCIETY OF OURS MAY REALLY WANT AS THEY APPROACH DEATH.

?" MUSIC: Theme Music IN
(Up in the clear. Then fade down and weave through Introduction.)

" Narration 2: EVERYONE IS GOING TO DIE. BUT, EACH OF US IS GOING TO DO IT IN OUR OWN WAY. WHEN WE FACE OUR DEATH OR THAT OF SOMEONE CLOSE TO US, WHAT WE NEED AND WHAT WE WANT DEPENDS ON WHO WE ARE. AND, IN THIS NATION OF IMMIGRANTS, OUR RELIGION, THE LANGUAGE WE SPEAK, THE WAYS OF OUR CULTURE ALL INFLUENCE OUR VIEWS ON DYING.

27" Lavera: I once attended a Baptist church one Sunday and heard a powerful sermon by a preacher who talked about is...
Read the full transcript

Timing and Cues

Timing and Cues

Program III:
Series Title: Heart-to-Heart: Caring for the Dying
Program Title: Respecting Diversity
Total Program Length 58:00
(Program includes PRI logo, but OK to air on all radio stations.)

00:00:00 Incue: "Heart-to-Heart, caring for the dying. From Public Radio International. This program…..….."

00:21:03 Outcue: "You're listening to Heart-to-Heart, from Public Radio International. You can purchase a copy of this program or learn more about health care for the dying, at our website, hearttoheartradio.org."

41 sec music bed for ID

00:21:44 Incue: "(Church music in) Religion has a profound impact of the way people view dying …..…"

00:38:35 Outcue: "You're listening to Heart-to-Heart, from Public Radio International."

50 sec music bed for ID

00:39:26 Incue: "(Jazz music in) When does cultural stereotyping and mis-communication become outright racism?………"

00:58:00 Outcue: "…….PRI Logo"

Musical Works

List of musical cuts included in the Heart-to-Heart Radio series:
All musical cuts were composed and performed by the Artist
All music is owned by the Artist.
The Heart-to-Heart project has rights to use all music in this series

Artist Title
Stephen Saxon Theme music (no title)
David Norfleet Various cuts from demo CD and composed for show
Jim Quinn Various cuts (untitled)
Fernando Celicion Corn Silk (from Kokepeli Dreams CD)
Wei-Shan Lui Song of the Returning Fisherman
Faith Presbyterian Choir (Traditional Gospel)

Additional Files

Related Website

http://www.hearttoheartradio.org