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What's the Word? Religion and the State

From: Modern Language Association
Length: 29:00

Three writers whose work explores the intersection of religion and the state Read the full description.

Default-piece-image-1 Search the web for “religion and the state,” and you come up with millions of hits, from world surveys to cross-cultural observations, from government exhibitions to blogs to Supreme Court decisions.   Over the centuries, writers, too, have explored this complex  subject—in fiction, journals, letters, and essays.   Barry O’Connell talks about William Apess, a nineteenth-century American Indian writer,  Methodist preacher, and political activist; Paul Strohm tells us about the prison letters of Sir Thomas More; and Kate Holland explores  “The Grand Inquisitor,” part of Dostoyevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov.

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Piece Description

Search the web for “religion and the state,” and you come up with millions of hits, from world surveys to cross-cultural observations, from government exhibitions to blogs to Supreme Court decisions.   Over the centuries, writers, too, have explored this complex  subject—in fiction, journals, letters, and essays.   Barry O’Connell talks about William Apess, a nineteenth-century American Indian writer,  Methodist preacher, and political activist; Paul Strohm tells us about the prison letters of Sir Thomas More; and Kate Holland explores  “The Grand Inquisitor,” part of Dostoyevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov.