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1968

From: Talking History
Length: 29:00

Our interview features Mark Kurlansky who joins host Bryan Le Beau to discuss just what made 1968 "the year that rocked the world," and Robert Brent Toplin reflects on why opposition to the war in Iraq seems muted in comparison to the Vietnam era.
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1968
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Talking History

Default-piece-image-1 The show will air the week of July 25th on those stations carrying Talking History. It may be used prior to, or after that week. For use the week of July 25th: 1968: The Year That Rocked the World According to Bryan Le Beau's guest this week, Mark Kurlansky: “There has never been a year like 1968, and it is unlikely that there will ever be one again.” Kurlansky discusses his reasons for this statement and his latest book, 1968: The Year That Rocked the World. And Robert Brent Toplin joins us to comment on why the opposition to the war in Iraq seems muted in comparison to the Vietnam era. Robert Brent Toplin is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.

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Piece Description

The show will air the week of July 25th on those stations carrying Talking History. It may be used prior to, or after that week. For use the week of July 25th: 1968: The Year That Rocked the World According to Bryan Le Beau's guest this week, Mark Kurlansky: “There has never been a year like 1968, and it is unlikely that there will ever be one again.” Kurlansky discusses his reasons for this statement and his latest book, 1968: The Year That Rocked the World. And Robert Brent Toplin joins us to comment on why the opposition to the war in Iraq seems muted in comparison to the Vietnam era. Robert Brent Toplin is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.

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Review of 1968

"Talking History, 1968", begins by telling the listener it is a production of the Organization of American Historians. Get ready for factoids galore! Bryan LeBeau is comfortable and engaging as host of the half hour. He also knows his historical stuff.
Familiar songs of the era (often not by the performer of record) are used effectively to keep the show moving, and it sometimes needs that extra push. A guest commentary comparing the public's response to VietNam and Iraq doesn't really break new ground. And a review of a website about The Pill seems to work here primarily *because this is a historian-produced show. Overall I found "Talking History" interesting and engaging. I'll check out others to see if they would work well on our station as a special program.

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Oh What I Really Want To Write!

I just deleted a lot of writing. Here's is the most delicate way I can review this series/program.

This program is an example of why grant funding for programming is dangerous to our system. A lot of folks think that corporate underwriters can easily influence the nature and perspective of our programming. "Tell the story or we pull our money" is the conventional thinking. Frankly, grants are worse. You know you're going into it strings attached.

I knew listening to this piece that something just didn't seem "right." The segment on the 10 most harmful books of the last couple hundred years time perked my ear. The list originated with a "conservative economic" publication. So you get a lot of communist stuff and Mien Kemp etc...but then you get the KINSEY REPORT and THE FEMINE MYSTIC. There needs a bit explanation on how these books that have more to do with sex and sexual identity ended up on a list with Adolph Hitler and the Communist Manifesto. I just couldn't listen to the rest of the show with some sneaking suspicions. When was any book "harmful"? The code words abound like that through out this program.

A couple of clicks on the producers web site and, for those who need it-like me, a Google search or two and you'll see that this program is set up to tell stories in support the grant makers perspective. The program and the grant maker just seem to tightly woven together. To be sure, some notable public broadcasting legends are associated with this program, but you be the judge.

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Review of 1968

Nice historical and entertaining piece not only for those who lived during the time, or know someone who did. While the Viet Nam/Iraq wars remain topical comparisons, overall the piece reinforces the lasting impact the year 1968, and the whole 60's era had on domestic and world history. Mark Kurlansky elaborates quite well on significant events pre and post 1968, and the host adds to the significance of the topic. I would have given this the highest rating except that there have already been a few other extensive print pieces featuring the year on the anniversaries (1988, 1998). Be sure to also check out "Salt, a World History" by Mark Kurlansky.

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Broadcast History

Show will air the week of July 25th but may be used any time

Timing and Cues

00:07" Welcome to Talking History."
26:34 "And that's it for another week of Talking History."

Related Website

http://www.oah.org/talkinghistory/