Caption: Dr. Seth Moore, a wildlife biologist with the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, tracks radio-collared moose on reservation lands.  , Credit: Photo by Carah Thomas
Image by: Photo by Carah Thomas 
Dr. Seth Moore, a wildlife biologist with the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, tracks radio-collared moose on reservation lands.  

Minnesota Moose Numbers On The Decline

From: WTIP
Length: 06:45

Moose hold a special place in the hearts of most Minnesotans. To many, they represent wilderness and the north woods like no other animal. Native Americans in the region have long had a sacred connection to moose, and the name itself means “eater of twigs” in Ojibwe. But moose aren’t doing well in Minnesota. In the northwestern part of the state, the population has collapsed, dropping from over 4,000 animals in the mid-1980’s, to less than 100 today. The focus now is on the herd in northeastern Minnesota, which is also on the decline, and where people are working to understand what’s happening and why.

Dr_seth_moore_small Reporter Carah Thomas, of WTIP North Shore Community Radio in Grand Marais, MN, spent time in the field with moose researcher Dr. Seth Moore, a wildlife biologist with the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, and talked with other leading scientists, including Dr. Rolf Peterson and the DNR’s Mark Lenarz for this story.

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Piece Description

Reporter Carah Thomas, of WTIP North Shore Community Radio in Grand Marais, MN, spent time in the field with moose researcher Dr. Seth Moore, a wildlife biologist with the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, and talked with other leading scientists, including Dr. Rolf Peterson and the DNR’s Mark Lenarz for this story.

Transcript

Moose hold a special place in the hearts of most Minnesotans. To many, they represent wilderness and the north woods like no other animal. Native Americans in the region have long had a sacred connection to moose, and the name itself means “eater of twigs” in Ojibwe. But moose aren’t doing well in Minnesota. In the northwestern part of the state, the population has collapsed, dropping from over 4,000 animals in the mid-1980s to less than 100 today. The focus now is on the herd in northeastern Minnesota, which is also on the decline. The 2010 aerial moose survey estimates the population at about 5,500 animals, down from last year's estimate of 7,500. Teams of researchers, concerned individuals, institutions, and agencies are trying to understand what's happening to the moose, and why.

Dr. Seth Moore is a fish and wildlife biologist with the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippe...
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Intro and Outro

INTRO:

Moose hold a special place in the hearts of most Minnesotans. Catching sight of one of these magnificent animals is a thrill, for locals and visitors alike. But moose are disappearing from the landscape. Carah Thomas, of WTIP North Shore Community Radio in Grand Marais, MN has this report.

OUTRO:

That was Carah Thomas with WTIP North Shore Community Radio in Grand Marais, Minnesota, online at wtip.org. Support for this feature comes from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Additional Credits

Support for this feature comes from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.