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In America, Does Pluralist Democracy Still Work?

From: Carnegie Council
Series: Global Ethics Corner
Length: 02:00

Has pluralism in America emphasized private interest over public good? Does the market for ideas need more supervision, or should the market rule?

Globalethicscorner_logo1_small Created and managed by Carnegie Council Senior Program Director and Senior Fellow William Vocke, Global Ethics Corner is a weekly 90-second segment devoted to newsworthy ethical issues.

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Piece Description

Created and managed by Carnegie Council Senior Program Director and Senior Fellow William Vocke, Global Ethics Corner is a weekly 90-second segment devoted to newsworthy ethical issues.

Transcript

America is a representative republic. We can't all participate in public decisions, but we can choose representatives.

These legislators face a dilemma. Should they: 1) transmit the ideas of their constituents, or 2) rely on their own background? Most find a compromise, but how do they know constituents' views?

Personal contact is arbitrary. Politicians' intuitions are unreliable. Polls give a sense of opinion, but little guidance on specific legislation. The media often have an agenda, including selling advertising, and the publics' views are not constant.

Pluralism offers an elegant solution.

America is described as a country of joiners. People join together, in sports leagues, investment clubs, interest groups, et cetera.

If something matters, people seek and join others who share their views. In politics, any idea that attracts significant attention is represented by a group.

S...
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Additional Credits

William Vocke- Producer, Program Director, Writer and Voice Talent
Deborah Carroll- Production Manager
Robert Smithline- Editor
Terence Hurley- Editor
Ina Pira- Media Coordinator

Related Website

www.carnegiecouncil.org