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Overcoming Appalachian Stereotypes

From: With Good Reason
Length: 29:46

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Three professors discuss how stereotypes of Appalachia diverge from reality, and what makes Appalachian dialect distinctive to outsiders’ ears. Read the full description.

Amyclarkappstereotypes_small The announcement that CBS plans to create a new reality show called “The Real Beverly Hillbillies” has already generated objections that it would foster more disparaging views of the Appalachian Mountain culture. The show would follow an Appalachian family as they adjust to life as Hollywood millionaires. English professor Parks Lanier is tired of Appalachian stereotypes and says some of this country’s richest literature comes from the mountains. Phil Leonard takes his students on an annual bus tour of Appalachian regions. Also featured: Amy Clark (UVA-Wise) studies how people from Appalachian communities feel about their dialect. She says many try to change their speech when they move out of the area, hiding their true origin. Broadcast on NPR stations in Virginia and Washington, DC the week of December 6-12, 2003.

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Piece Description

The announcement that CBS plans to create a new reality show called “The Real Beverly Hillbillies” has already generated objections that it would foster more disparaging views of the Appalachian Mountain culture. The show would follow an Appalachian family as they adjust to life as Hollywood millionaires. English professor Parks Lanier is tired of Appalachian stereotypes and says some of this country’s richest literature comes from the mountains. Phil Leonard takes his students on an annual bus tour of Appalachian regions. Also featured: Amy Clark (UVA-Wise) studies how people from Appalachian communities feel about their dialect. She says many try to change their speech when they move out of the area, hiding their true origin. Broadcast on NPR stations in Virginia and Washington, DC the week of December 6-12, 2003.

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Review of Overcoming Appalachian Stereotypes

This piece provides a brief insight into the stereotypes of Appalchia and what it can mean to be Appalchian. I enjoyed this piece, and look forward to many more broadcasts pertaining to Appalachia.

Broadcast History

Broadcast on NPR stations in Virginia and Washington, DC the weeks of June 21-27 and December 6-12, 2003.

Transcript

Timing and Cues

IN CUE: (Music)
OUTCUE: “. . . I’m Sarah McConnell. Thanks for listening.”
FOLLOWED BY _ :16 music bed out

Related Website

http://www.withgoodreasonradio.org