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Cafe Rebeldia

From: Homelands Productions
Series: Worlds of Difference
Length: 08:16

A Zapatista co-op sells organic coffee on the growing global "solidarity market."

Prxrebeldiaphoto_small The Mutvitz cooperative in Chiapas, Mexico is using its ties to the Zapatista rebel movement to tap into the growing global "solidarity market" for organic, shade-grown coffee. In this sound-rich story we meet co-op members, who are Maya Indians, as they entertain a group of American and European buyers who are motivated as much by their political convictions as by their desire to make a buck. We learn first-hand about the farmers' business model, and about their cultural aspirations. They see organic farming not just as a way to earn a living, but as a way to strengthen their indigenous identity.

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Piece Description

The Mutvitz cooperative in Chiapas, Mexico is using its ties to the Zapatista rebel movement to tap into the growing global "solidarity market" for organic, shade-grown coffee. In this sound-rich story we meet co-op members, who are Maya Indians, as they entertain a group of American and European buyers who are motivated as much by their political convictions as by their desire to make a buck. We learn first-hand about the farmers' business model, and about their cultural aspirations. They see organic farming not just as a way to earn a living, but as a way to strengthen their indigenous identity.

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Review of Cafe Rebeldia

The producers go on location to delve into the topic of identity, politics, and culture as perceived by the Chiapas citizens. Great interviews with regular people who best articulated their argument by being simple and to the point.

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Review of Cafe Rebeldia

A piece that is dominated by lovely use of sound that really takes gives the listener a strong sense of place. I liked the interviews with the people involved, especially an elder mourning the loss of old ways, the disappearance of animals from the environment, his vanishing language.
We pay fancy prices in the West for designer coffees - politically correct coffees - but it doesn’t seem to really be making a dent in the lives of the people who most depend on selling the coffee they grow – but at least it’s a start. The movement needs to catch on the way that protests against GM products in Britain and Europe did – people demanded the right to eat healthy and safe food. Now we need to start demanding for the rights of the people who grow our food – especially those on the lower economic scale who aren’t in a position to make demands on their own behalf.
This piece at least gives them a hearing.

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Related Website

http://www.homelands.org/worlds/chiapas.html