Caption: The 2009 "Remember the Removal" Cherokee riders, Credit: Remember the Removal, Cherokee Nation
Image by: Remember the Removal, Cherokee Nation 
The 2009 "Remember the Removal" Cherokee riders 

Young Cherokees ride to remember

From: Jordan Nelson
Length: 03:41

This year, a group of young Cherokees set out on a journey to remember, on bicycle. It took them nearly 1,000 miles away from home--and back again. KOSU's Jordan Nelson, himself a Cherokee citizen, rode the last few miles with the group. Here's his report. Read the full description.

Riderscropped_small These eight Cherokee citizens--ages 16 to 24--traveled the Trail of Tears by bicycle.  They left the capital of the Cherokee Nation--Tahlequah, Okla.--this June and drove to New Echota, Ga., where their ancestors lived more than 170 years ago.  After touring various sites around the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation, they packed onto their bicycles, and began to pedal home.

A total of 12 Cherokees rode the Trail of Tears, including Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chad Smith.  They biked a total of about 1,000 miles, averaging 60-70 miles a day.

They returned to the Tahlequah and the Cherokee Nation July 15, to much local fanfare.

The ride was the second of its kind, with a group of young Cherokees making the same trip 25 years ago in 1984.  Todd Enlow, the ride organizer, hopes to make this an annual event so young Cherokees have the chance to retrace their ancestors' footsteps.

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Piece Description

These eight Cherokee citizens--ages 16 to 24--traveled the Trail of Tears by bicycle.  They left the capital of the Cherokee Nation--Tahlequah, Okla.--this June and drove to New Echota, Ga., where their ancestors lived more than 170 years ago.  After touring various sites around the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation, they packed onto their bicycles, and began to pedal home.

A total of 12 Cherokees rode the Trail of Tears, including Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chad Smith.  They biked a total of about 1,000 miles, averaging 60-70 miles a day.

They returned to the Tahlequah and the Cherokee Nation July 15, to much local fanfare.

The ride was the second of its kind, with a group of young Cherokees making the same trip 25 years ago in 1984.  Todd Enlow, the ride organizer, hopes to make this an annual event so young Cherokees have the chance to retrace their ancestors' footsteps.

Broadcast History

Broadcast on KOSU (Stillwater, Okla.), July 21, 2009

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

A group of young Cherokees completed a bike trip July 15 that took them 1,000 miles away from home. Their purpose: to retrace the Trail of Tears on bicycle, to raise awareness of their history. KOSU's Jordan Nelson, himself a Cherokee citizen, rode the last few miles with the group. Here's his report.

OUTRO:

The Cherokee Nation plans on retracing the route on bicycle again next year.

Additional Credits

Originally reported and produced by student reporter Jordan Nelson for KOSU (Stillwater, Okla.)

Related Website

http://www.remembertheremoval.org http://www.kosu.org