Caption: Phil at work, Credit: Sejan Yun
Image by: Sejan Yun 
Phil at work 

Gems #932 Pop and Bluegrass I: Democracy and Bluegrass

From: Philip Nusbaum
Series: Gems of Bluegrass
Length: 08:36

piece suggested for Aug 1-7, 2009 for regular users. But there's no real date peg. Read the full description.

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When it comes to bluegrass, the fans are more than passive consumers. Sometimes they say that to spread bluegrass, all you have to do is let people hear the banjo. Well, there’s some truth in that. The instruments used to play bluegrass make bluegrass different than pop. But it’s more than that, too.  The differences relate to differences in the values the two idioms represent.

 

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Gems of Bluegrass are 5 - 8 minutes drop-in modules that look at bluegrass / old time history, aesthetics and culture. Each Gem consists of multiple song clips with commentary over music beds. For an insightful weekly 1-hour bluegrass show that includes Gems of Bluegrass, see the Bluegrass Review, available from PRX. Contact Phil Nusbaum at pnusbaum@bitstram.net to download the show from www.bluegrassreview.com.

 

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Piece Description

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When it comes to bluegrass, the fans are more than passive consumers. Sometimes they say that to spread bluegrass, all you have to do is let people hear the banjo. Well, there’s some truth in that. The instruments used to play bluegrass make bluegrass different than pop. But it’s more than that, too.  The differences relate to differences in the values the two idioms represent.

 

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Gems of Bluegrass are 5 - 8 minutes drop-in modules that look at bluegrass / old time history, aesthetics and culture. Each Gem consists of multiple song clips with commentary over music beds. For an insightful weekly 1-hour bluegrass show that includes Gems of Bluegrass, see the Bluegrass Review, available from PRX. Contact Phil Nusbaum at pnusbaum@bitstram.net to download the show from www.bluegrassreview.com.

 

Transcript

Bear Family Flatt & Scruggs 1949 – 1958 Doin’ My Time
Prestige Lilly Bros Have a Feast Here Tonight Miller’s Cave
Bear Family Flatt & Scruggs 1949 – 1958 I’ll Just Pretend
Original Jazz Classics The Quintet Jazz at Massey hall All the Things You Are
Springboard lp Various, the Collegians Original Oldies v. 2 Zoom Zoom Zoom
Columbia Various, Sheryl Crow De-Lovely soundtrack Begin the Beguine
Rural Rhythm Mac Martin & the Dixie Travelers 24 Bluegrass Favorites Swingin’ a Nine Pound Hammer
Read the full transcript

Timing and Cues

in: music
out: UA

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

When it comes to bluegrass, the fans are more than passive consumers. Sometimes they say that to spread bluegrass, all you have to do is let people hear the banjo. Well, there’s some truth in that. The instruments used to play bluegrass make bluegrass different than pop. But it’s more than that, too. The differences relate to differences in the values the two idioms represent.

OUTRO:

after the UA, play some other bluegrass where everybody is contributing to the band sound. I'd choose Hello City Limits by Red Allen, or some early Flatt and Scruggs