Caption: Me and My Dad
Me and My Dad 

Father's Day

From: Jake Warga
Length: 05:25

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Going through my parents' stuff 10 years after their deaths, I found a box of cassettes of my father interviewing me when I was a kid. Simple and sweet. Read the full description.
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Father's Day
From
Jake Warga

Jakeandfather_small Clearing out stuff of my parent's 10yrs after their death, I found a box of cassettes of my Father interviewing me when I was a kid. Aired "Public Radio Weekend America Whathaeyou" Winner "Silver Reel" NFCB

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Piece Description

Clearing out stuff of my parent's 10yrs after their death, I found a box of cassettes of my Father interviewing me when I was a kid. Aired "Public Radio Weekend America Whathaeyou" Winner "Silver Reel" NFCB

5 Comments Atom Feed

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Happy Father's Day

Trip down memory lane with found audio from save-everything family. I always wondered what it would be like to see videos of myself when I was young, or tapes. I actually have a few old cassette tapes my Mom recently gave me.

But I find out, and confirm by listening to this piece, is more important than hearing me, it's going to be hearing my Mom & Dad. They are still alive right now, and I cherish the times I see them and hear them. But there will be a time. I reflect on it when I see my Grandma Gert on old videos where she's holding my newborn son.

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Review of Father's Day

For a while during the 1990s Father's Day played second fiddle to Mother's Day. By now we've entered an era of good feelings about Dad. Liberated by generations of people we once called Women's Libbers, we realize that Big Daddy needn't be a patriarchal jerk.

Once again journalist Jake Warga has spliced together slices of life seamlessly, with lots of wisdom yet with the illusion of artless audio verite. This drop-in has already been praised by three reviewers, and it has been licensed by no fewer than seven radio stations from New Hampshire and Austin, Texas to Idaho. It has been aired by at least two stations every year since Warga produced it in 2004. Buoyed by the lilt and loving remarks of his father's voice, as well as the squeaks of Warga, an "overly documented only child" at ages two-and-a-half, four, and seven, from its inception this piece was an instant success. It has gone on to become a kind of radio classic, in part because of such questions young Warga asks his father as "What is poo-poo made of?"

Far be it from me to urge PDs to bend their tired ears yet again. Still, I'm hoping that at least a couple of our overworked, unacknowledged legislators of public radio license this piece in 2008. Listening to Jake Warga's dead father's tape-recorded voice chatting with his young son -- now perhaps as old as his dad when the tapes were made in the 1970s --- may be one sure-fire way of paying homage to Papa on Father's Day.

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Review of Father's Day

The human voice can evoke so many more emotions than an image. Does the ear have a direct line to the heart? It must because this piece is an emotional one. This is a well-done piece featuring a little boy and his father, narrated by the little boy all grown up. Perfect for Father's Day. Warning: it's a tear jerker.

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Transcript

Father’s Day Tape (PRW) ver6/16/04 FINAL
(Partial TAPE Transcription only)

I have a problem with fahter’s Day: Father’s day for everyone, will eventually become a ‘holiday’ to remind us of what’s missing.

My father died 10yrs ago. To mark the anniversary, I drove to LA where I grew-up to clear out my parents stuff I had in storage. My mother died a year after my dad. Overwhelmed at the time, I put a lot of things in storage. Things I thought I might want some day. Well, it’s someday.

I dive into boxes, into the past. My father was a journalist/writer and I kind of remember him having a cassette recorder. In one box I find bag of cassette tapes. A nervous excitement grows in me as I read the labels because recently I’ve become a journalist too—a radio journalist. One’s labeled “Jake 2 1/2”

[tape 1:14: “Can you say Daddy?” end: “…are you going to sleep tonight…for a chan...
Read the full transcript