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WNR: A Short History of the Taliban

From: War News Radio
Length: 07:59

From "Pen to Paper" (March 13, 2009): War News Radio cracks open the history books to see who today's Taliban are, and where they came from. Read the full description.

Wnrpodart_medium The U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 removed the Taliban from power...officially.   But in the years since, they've regained a foothold in Afghanistan and expanded their influence within the region.  So just who were the Taliban before 2001, and who are they now?  It all goes back to a Cold War power struggle.  War News Radio's Emily Hager brings us this story.

This piece was featured in "Pen to Paper" on March 13, 2009.

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Piece Description

The U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 removed the Taliban from power...officially.   But in the years since, they've regained a foothold in Afghanistan and expanded their influence within the region.  So just who were the Taliban before 2001, and who are they now?  It all goes back to a Cold War power struggle.  War News Radio's Emily Hager brings us this story.

This piece was featured in "Pen to Paper" on March 13, 2009.

1 Comment Atom Feed

Caption: PRX default User image

Really informative

Are you someone who has heard about the Taliban but doesn't know quite what it is? Thanks to Emily Hage's strong reporting, we can all get to know the basics of this controversial group.
This is a concise, informative, and professional piece that gives you the facts so you can then create your own opinion on the topic. Emily's clear voice helps to keep the listener's attention, and the pacing, and order of events help to follow the interesting but sometimes complicated facts. The piece is easy to follow thanks to the lack of distractions such as music or background noise, but it would be helpful to have the definition of some terms that aren't common knowledge for many listeners. A more inviting intro before the "cold facts" would add to it, as well as an outro that resumes the main points. The interviews add a personal and real feeling.
This is an interesting piece about a complex topic that is worth listening to.

Additional Credits

Swarthmore College

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www.warnewsradio.org