Caption: Morning Rolled Oats, Credit: Janice Lang
Image by: Janice Lang 
Morning Rolled Oats 

Mutual Suffering

From: The humble Farmer
Length: 04:42

Mutual Suffering is the basis for most of the successful marriages in Knox County today

Humbleoats_small With Mutual Suffering man and wife each get at least a piece of what they’d like. You want to shingle the roof because the rain is starting to leak in and rot the boards, but she feels a new kitchen stove is more important. You end up shingling half the roof and she buys a second hand stove with only two burners that work. That makes it fair.

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Piece Description

With Mutual Suffering man and wife each get at least a piece of what they’d like. You want to shingle the roof because the rain is starting to leak in and rot the boards, but she feels a new kitchen stove is more important. You end up shingling half the roof and she buys a second hand stove with only two burners that work. That makes it fair.

Transcript

7. Many Knox County marriages that end in divorce could be saved, according to Gramp Wiley, who is Tenant’s Harbor’s most prominent marriage councilor.
“Be content to let your wife be boss,” he advises. “If she wants to cook and clean and scrub, don’t argue with her. If it keeps her happy, don’t complain.”
Young people don’t seem to realize that anyone who’s careful in selecting a mate can have an ideal marriage. Suppose that neither of you ever noticed that a wet towel or a wet water glass causes a white water stain on varnished surfaces. Perhaps you both drop your clothes beside the bed or in the bathroom and leave them there until they mold. Or it might be that you each have a cat that walks on the kitchen counters and eats greasy scraps out of your frying pan. Great! You, and no one else, deserve to be married to each other.
On the other hand, suppose that each one of you knocks t...
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Intro and Outro

INTRO:

Many Knox County marriages that end in divorce could be saved, according to Gramp Wiley, who is Tenant’s Harbor’s most prominent marriage councilor

OUTRO:

Then you have the impasse where nothing can be done. That’s a situation where nobody owes anybody anything, so you both sit home, sulk and suffer nobly in silence while thinking, “We never go anywhere --- we never do nothing.”