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Image by: David Zellaby 

Believing in Santa Claus

From: Youth Radio
Length: 03:46

Youth Radio talked to young people of different ages about their belief in Santa Claus. Read the full description.

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Youth Radio interviewed three groups of young people about their beliefs in Santa Claus.  The youngest group, 2 first-graders, espoused their admiration for the big guy.  The 2 fourth-grader girls are another other story.  They’re using science and “logic” to discount what they find to be a rather naïve belief and a passé character.  And the oldest group, 2 teenagers, have more nuanced and surprising perspectives about believing in Saint Nick and in belief structures in general. The secrecy around these Santa myth stories is echoed in the framing of the piece: young people only refer to Santa by allusion, so as not to spoil the myth for younger listeners.

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Piece Description

Youth Radio interviewed three groups of young people about their beliefs in Santa Claus.  The youngest group, 2 first-graders, espoused their admiration for the big guy.  The 2 fourth-grader girls are another other story.  They’re using science and “logic” to discount what they find to be a rather naïve belief and a passé character.  And the oldest group, 2 teenagers, have more nuanced and surprising perspectives about believing in Saint Nick and in belief structures in general. The secrecy around these Santa myth stories is echoed in the framing of the piece: young people only refer to Santa by allusion, so as not to spoil the myth for younger listeners.

5 Comments Atom Feed

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Rerview of Believing in Santa Claus

The piece was concise and enjoyable. The interviews of the children seemed to be very candid. As someone who has personally worked with kids for video projects I know how difficult it is to get a five year old to warm up to a microphone or camera. It was really funny to hear a little girl say “well if you just use logic…” This piece took an unexpected turn and became a little sad when I heard some of the reasons why kids stopped believing in Santa Clause, but it was valuable insight. For some people, Santa Clause is a huge staple in their childhood. After all there’s always the Easter Bunny.

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Review - Believeing in Santa Claus

I wonder if people ever wonder why we believe or once used to believe in Santa Claus. Do you happen to believe in Santa Claus? Asha’s piece will completely startle your mind and make you think, “Do you believe in Santa Claus?” This piece is very unique in the way she chose to set it up. She didn’t just focus on one age group to interview rather went beyond the age groups and chose to speak to people of different ages. It brought a smile when hearing the youngest age group it reminded me of when I used to believe in Mr. Claus. I really enjoyed hearing this piece not only because it had humor in it, but as well because it took me back in time and I remembered some good memories. Asha’s voice is rich in tone, she has a unique style. Everything she talks about and the interviews I can perfectly visualize the face of the children when they were speaking to her. I wish she would of added music, at least just at the beginning to get the audience more hooked in the piece. But overall I think she did a magnificent job putting the piece together.

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YEB review of "Believing in Santa Claus"

For many children, Santa Claus is a staple in their childhood, right next to naps and cheesy Goldfish crackers. The realization that this imaginary jolly character, is well, imaginary, is always a bit difficult. Asha Richardson tackled this topic in the most endearing and heartfelt way. As one would expect, little evidence is needed to back up the believe of Old Saint Nick for younger children. After all, "No one can be coming by and just giving me presents," therefore it is reason enough for this man to exist. The piece transitions to older kids, as the rationalize their way past the old tale and recount the effects disproving Santa Claus caused. Richardson does a good job working the audio clips into piece. Richardson is obviously a very good reporter. I feel like the intro could do with clips of Christmas carols, or even ripping of gift wrap to connect the listener to the Christmas theme. And maybe an analysis of this rationalization in the narration. The piece drops off towards the end and doesn't quite wrap up the idea of believing in Santa Claus. Living in the heart of the city, with a fire escape instead of a chimney, I never believed in Santa Claus or any of the folklore that went with him. It was interesting for me to hear all these different theories, but I needed more. Just like Joshua Raifman felt, there was a piece of a puzzle missing.

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Transcript

Believing in You Know Who
Asha Richardson/Youth Radio
NPR’s Weekend Edition
December 2009

INTRO;
…Youth Radio’s Asha Richarson…

SCRIPT:
Many young kids spend all year looking forward to Christmas morning’s stealthy visitor. So we asked twin brothers, Nicholas and Peter Reifenstein, why they believe in a certain someone. First we hear from Nicholas.

Nicholas Reifenstein: I think I believe in him because usually when I go to bed, I, I , I try to go to sleep, then suddenly I seem to be asleep like he put me to sleep so so I wouldn’t hear him putting presents under the tree.

Peter Reifenstein: My name is Peter, and I think he’s real because when I wake up I see all these presents and who could be coming by and just giving me presents?

Just three years later, some of those sweet ideas, transform into critical analysis of what is scientifically possible. Maya Raiford-Cohen and Aiko Ke...
Read the full transcript

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

We don’t want to ruin the secret for any little ears that might be listening, so parents be warned: throughout this next story, you’ll hear some skeptics, questioning the existence of a certain jolly someone. Youth Radio’s Asha Richardson took an informal survey, talking to people of different ages about their interpretations of Christmas morning’s magical visitor. She started with first graders.

OUTRO:

Asha Richardson’s story was produced by Youth Radio.

Additional Credits

Please credit Youth Radio and the reporter in the intro & outro.

Related Website

http://www.youthradio.org/