Caption: There appears to be a horse, in the sewer., Credit: Image by The Internet.
Image by: Image by The Internet. 
There appears to be a horse, in the sewer. 

NAMAPAHH Global Warming- Native Americans in the frontline

From: KSVR Studios: Skagit Valley Radio
Series: NAMAPAHH First People's Radio Show
Length: 58:00

The Elders and Native American scientists & environmentalists are saying that this is a time to re-connect.

Sewerhorse_small The Elders and Native American scientists & environmentalists are saying that this is a time to re-connect. The interviews and voices you will hear on this special program, are from the frontlines and trenches of places that are feeling the heavy impact of climate change-Global Warming. This program features a compilation of interviews with visitors who stopped over in the NW, in 2005, for three separate gatherings: During the summer of '05, A small contingent of Aleut Natives visited the NW as part of a local Annual Tribal Canoe Journey - paddling with nearly 80 tribal, inter-tribal, and first nation canoes who travel on historic Salish waterways together. Boat building was brought back to the Aleuts by their non-native skipper Mark Daniels & supported by Aleut Scientist Larry Miecurloff (meh-cool-ee-off) as a way to heal the loss of culture and the struggle for continued sustenance.These bidarkas are handcrafted in their homelands of Saint Paul-Pribilof Island, AK. Like the NW cedar canoes, their vessels are also part of a traditional resurgence. Miecurloff is also from their Island, and was a presenter at a NNG Conference that took place in Blaine WA. He was speaking on behalf of the Alaskan Native Science Commission about the very real backlash of Climate change-Global Warming, which is affecting his Aleut community and impacting the far reaches & Villages of the North. He is concerned and alarmed about the social & economic stress that the melting ice is having on their culture, food sources, and many other aspects that help them survive as a people. He says all are being threatened. He said that young on up to the Elders are really paying severe consequences. In the late Spring of 2005, Tulalip Tribes hosted an Elders & Youth Gathering. In a topically related interview with an Eskimo Elder known as U.N.C.L.E (Angaangaq, The Man Who Looks Like His Uncle), who was visiting and traveling from Greenland, carrying a similar message and concerns on behalf of his mother and his Village. Through first hand knowledge and via a special drum song, "Melting the Ice in the heart of man", he is also trying to warn us all.

To hear the full audio, sign up for a free PRX account or log in.

Piece Description

The Elders and Native American scientists & environmentalists are saying that this is a time to re-connect. The interviews and voices you will hear on this special program, are from the frontlines and trenches of places that are feeling the heavy impact of climate change-Global Warming. This program features a compilation of interviews with visitors who stopped over in the NW, in 2005, for three separate gatherings: During the summer of '05, A small contingent of Aleut Natives visited the NW as part of a local Annual Tribal Canoe Journey - paddling with nearly 80 tribal, inter-tribal, and first nation canoes who travel on historic Salish waterways together. Boat building was brought back to the Aleuts by their non-native skipper Mark Daniels & supported by Aleut Scientist Larry Miecurloff (meh-cool-ee-off) as a way to heal the loss of culture and the struggle for continued sustenance.These bidarkas are handcrafted in their homelands of Saint Paul-Pribilof Island, AK. Like the NW cedar canoes, their vessels are also part of a traditional resurgence. Miecurloff is also from their Island, and was a presenter at a NNG Conference that took place in Blaine WA. He was speaking on behalf of the Alaskan Native Science Commission about the very real backlash of Climate change-Global Warming, which is affecting his Aleut community and impacting the far reaches & Villages of the North. He is concerned and alarmed about the social & economic stress that the melting ice is having on their culture, food sources, and many other aspects that help them survive as a people. He says all are being threatened. He said that young on up to the Elders are really paying severe consequences. In the late Spring of 2005, Tulalip Tribes hosted an Elders & Youth Gathering. In a topically related interview with an Eskimo Elder known as U.N.C.L.E (Angaangaq, The Man Who Looks Like His Uncle), who was visiting and traveling from Greenland, carrying a similar message and concerns on behalf of his mother and his Village. Through first hand knowledge and via a special drum song, "Melting the Ice in the heart of man", he is also trying to warn us all.

1 Comment Atom Feed

Caption: PRX default User image

Thank you

Hello,
I would like to share this radio show with others via a website ancientvoicescontemporarycontexts.org. May I have permission to add the mp2 file to that site with full credit?
Thank you.
Galen McKibben
Galen@twocircles.org

Related Website

http://www.ksvr.org