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Wheelchair Racer (poem)

From: ANITA PALLADINO
Length: :59

Profile/Poem of a Man Read the full description.

Default-piece-image-2 A doctor I once went to charged so little I didn't understand how he lived. He gave a tiny smile and a smaller shrug and replied, "How loose can you make you belt?" I've often wished he could have met the man in this poem.

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Piece Description

A doctor I once went to charged so little I didn't understand how he lived. He gave a tiny smile and a smaller shrug and replied, "How loose can you make you belt?" I've often wished he could have met the man in this poem.