Transcript for the 54:00 version version of The Clash: Revolution Rock

The Clash: Revolution Rock
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Music (under):

Tom Morello: The Clash?they were a much more reliable source of information and truth than the nightly news or the history teacher. And it made?it was that band that really helped me start thinking outside of the box.

Dave Marsh: The Clash opened the future to me. They were the optimists, they were the progressive thinkers, they weren?t the ones that said ?no future,? they said ?all future if we take it, if we seize it, if we make it.?

Joe: We weren?t parochial, we weren?t narrow-minded, we weren?t little Englanders. At least we had the suss to embrace what we were presented with, which was the world and all its weird varieties, and we tried to reflect that into the tracks.

PUNK ROCK IS AN ATTITUDE. AT ITS BEST, PUNK DRAWS IN THE COLLECTED ANGER AND ENERGY OF A ROOM AND UNLEASHES A FLURRY OF LOUD GUITARS AND BRUTAL HONESTY.

FOR THE CLASH, THAT ROOM KEPT ON GETTING LARGER AND LARGER. THE CLASH STARTED AS A PUNK BAND DURING ONE OF ENGLAND?S TROUBLED TIMES, BUT SOON FOUND THEMSELVES REFLECTING THE WORLD.

IN THE NEXT HOUR, WE?LL HEAR THE MUSIC AND MESSAGE OF THE CLASH. BAND MEMBERS JOE STRUMMER, MICK JONES, PAUL SIMONON AND TOPPER HEADON JOIN US, PLUS FILMMAKER JULIEN TEMPLE, GUITARIST TOM MORELLO AND WRITERS ANTONINO D?AMBROSIO AND DAVE MARSH.

I?M DELPHINE BLUE, AND WELCOME TO ?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK.?

Music end

MEMBERS OF THE CLASH WERE BARELY IN THEIR TEENS WHEN THEY SAW UPHEAVAL AROUND THE WORLD.

SINGER AND GUITARIST IN THE CLASH, JOE STRUMMER.

Joe: In ?68, the whole world was exploding. There was Paris, Vietnam, Grosvenor Square, the counter-culture, and we took it as normal. Because we had no frame of reference, we thought years like ?68 were completely the norm, and afterwards I often laugh thinking about it, because the whole world was exploding and turning over in the most amazing way. It was like riding a rocket.

FILMMAKER JULIEN TEMPLE SAW THE SOCIAL AND RACIAL UNREST IN LONDON.

Julien Temple: I think it was a time in the 70?s in England where it was quite polarized. There was a lot of unemployment and a lot of racism, which I think has been overcome a bit by now, we?ve lived together with different types of people, I?ve been walking around Brooklyn, London?s a bit like Brooklyn now, after 25 years you can actually get on with people now, but in the beginning there was a lot of fear and violence against people coming in, and I think the Clash came out of the background of that moment, was a very politicized period. So, certainly for kids, working class kids anyway at the time it was pretty bleak. And the Clash, at least the other members of the Clash certainly came out of that background, and Joe was able to articulate it better than most people, I think.

THE FIRST SONG BY THE CLASH CALLED FOR WHITE LONDONERS TO RISE UP AND FIGHT AGAINST VIOLENCE AND RACISM.

Music: White Riot (1:59)

?WHITE RIOT? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1977.

THE BAND?S NAME CAME EASILY TO THEM. ALL THEY HAD TO DO WAS LOOK AT THE PAPERS AND SEE THE WORD ?CLASH? EVERY DAY, CLASHES BETWEEN RACES, CLASSES, POLITICAL CAMPS, SQUATTERS, POLICE AND EVEN AMONG PUNK ROCKERS.

THE RACIAL HATRED AND CLASS WARFARE IN LONDON AT THE TIME GAVE STRENGTH TO POLITICAL GROUPS LIKE THE NATIONAL FRONT.

ANTONINO D?AMBROSIO IS THE AUTHOR OF ?LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR: THE PUNK ROCK POLITICS OF JOE STRUMMER.?

Antonino D?Ambrosio: The National Front were a neo-fascist, right-wing group that were racist in nature and targeted obviously the black community, the Afro-Caribbean and West Indians, but a large part of their racial hatred was directed towards what are considered Asian in England, which are Pakistani and Indian. They became entrenched in the late 70?s as there was rising unemployment and this great sense of alienation and hopelessness among this large group of young people. The dark side of punk rock is that punk rock aligned itself more and more to this sensibility.

WHILE THEIR LYRICS HAD A STRONG MESSAGE, THE CLASH ONLY PLAYED AT ONE POLITICAL RALLY. IT WAS CALLED ?ROCK AGAINST RACISM.?

JOE STRUMMER.

Joe: It was a strong anti-nazi league movement, which was kind of good cause a lot of skinheads started getting into punk and there was a big skinhead population, only some of whom were racist, and some of whom were anti-racist.

Music: London?s Burning (2:05)

?LONDON?S BURNING? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1977.

AUTHOR AND FILMMAKER ANTONINO D?AMBROSIO.
Antonino D?Ambrosio: Their unique backgrounds fused together to influence their aesthetic and ideological approach. Paul Simonon grew up in a part of London, Brixton, that was very heavily Afro-Caribbean and West Indian population of immigrants, and that really ended up influencing The Clash and Joe Strummer in particular with the reggae, dub, ska, all that musical sensibility came from Paul Simonon. And Mick Jones grew up in a housing project and was really raised by his grandmother, and that kind of social economic sensibility really influenced the Clash as well, and Joe Strummer was a diplomat?s son, so he grew up a little bit more of a strongly middle class background.

THEY ALL WENT TO ART SCHOOL, EACH FOR THEIR OWN REASONS. HERE?S BASSIST PAUL SIMONON, SINGER JOE STRUMMER AND GUITARIST MICK JONES.

Paul: I went to art school cause I wanted to be a painter, that?s how I saw my future.
Joe: If you were in the position I was, there?s only one answer to what to do after grade school, and that?s art school, the last resort for malingerers and bluffers and people who don?t want to work, basically.

Mick: That was how I thought you got into bands, cause I?d seen all the people I liked, and they?d been to art school, so I went to art school. Not to do art, but I wanted to go there to buy me some time and hoping to meet other musicians and stuff in the traditional manner.

Paul: Maybe the art school thing had messed me up too much already, and I just thought I can?t see myself in a room for the rest of my life doing this stuff, I?ve gotta do something a bit more exciting, cause it was too? I don?t know, it was the reason I got involved running around chucking bricks around, cause it was the only release I had.

Joe: I would say that going to school like that, in a place like that, meant that you became independent, didn?t expect anyone to do anything for you, and that was a big part of punk that, do the damn thing yourself and don?t expect anything from anybody.

JONES AND SIMONON WENT TO SEE STRUMMER?S BAND, THE 101ER?S PLAY AND WANTED HIM TO JOIN THE CLASH. THEIR FIRST ENCOUNTER IS A SNAPSHOT OF 70?S LONDON.

Joe: I first saw Mick and Paul at the Liston Grove Labour Exchange, and I was queuing up to get dole.
Paul: He definitely caught us looking at him, and he looked worried, I think he thought he was going to get done over.
Joe: I was in the queue and I could see them staring at me, and I didn?t realize that they?d seen the 101ers the previous weekend.
Paul: For that moment, he looked really timid and really in terror, it seemed.
Joe: I just ignored them, got my dole, and I was expecting them to tangle with me, say on the way to the door or out on the street.
Mick: We were looking on in awe, really, and I learned later that wasn?t what he was getting.
Joe: Yeah, I thought at first that it was going to be a bit of trouble, cause when people stare at you, it?s on or it isn?t, you know, and I was working out which one of them to punch first, actually, and I thought I?d punch Mick first, cause he was a bit thinner, and Paul looked a bit tasty.

Music: Career Opportunities (1:52)

?CAREER OPPORTUNITIES? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH.

YOU?RE LISTENING TO ?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK.? I?M DELPHINE BLUE.

JOE STRUMMER.

Joe: The first time I heard the word punk used to describe what anyone was doing was in Time Out, a London listing magazine, and I remember reading this caption, going ?what is this punk? What is this word?? and then the Pistols came through and it was clear what that meant.

AUTHOR AND FILMMAKER ANTONINO D?AMBROSIO.

Antonino D?Ambrosio: I found one of the earliest Joe Strummer quotes, and he says in 1976, ?I think people ought to know that we?re anti-fascist, anti-violence, anti-racist, and we?re pro-creative, we?re against ignorance.? Which was something that in and of itself was a very revolutionary thing for a band that was in the shadow at time of Sex Pistols and the movement was really really under attack. Punk rock was under attack by the monarchy, by the press, by other government institutions, by the police of course. And to have a band that was so stridently progressive and calling for unity of all kinds within the classes, within the races, within the immigrant community was really something that was shocking and frightening for the power structure that easily was trying to marginalize the Sex Pistols and other punk rock as being mindless or destructive and nihilistic.

THE SEX PISTOLS WERE ANOTHER LONDON PUNK ROCK BAND THAT SHOT TO FAME QUICKLY. THOUGH THE PISTOLS AND THE CLASH PLAYED TOGETHER EARLY ON, THEIR MESSAGES WERE VERY DIFFERENT.

Antonino D?Ambrosio: //while the Sex Pistols were saying no future, the Clash were saying there is a future, and we?re a part of it. We?re part of making that future, and that being engaged, rather than being disengaged, passion is a fashion. It?s cool to be passionate and emotional, you know, let?s do it.

THEY SUMMED UP THAT IDEA IN THIS NEXT SONG WITH THE LINES ?IF DEATH COMES SO CHEAP, THEN THE SAME GOES FOR LIFE.?

Music: Tommy Gun (3:17)

?TOMMY GUN? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1978.

BERNIE RHODES MANAGED THE CLASH IN THE EARLY DAYS. HE ENCOURAGED STRUMMER AND JONES TO WRITE SONGS ABOUT THEIR WORLD.

Joe: Bernie was the mentor. Bernie constructed the Clash, and Bernie focused its energies. We repaid him by being really good at what we were doing. But it was Bernie that told us to write about what we knew.
Mick: He used to say like look for it, say Paul looking in the paper, how about career opportunities.
Joe: The lack of education, the dead-end future of just working away your life.

THEIR LIVES CHANGED AFTER SIGNING TO A MAJOR LABEL.

Joe: We signed for 100,000 pounds, and at the time that seemed like a fortune. But later I found out that what we thought was a 5 record deal, in fact in the small print, like every corny story, it was in fact a 10 record deal.
Paul: I remember for days after me and Joe walking up the street and deliberating over the content of the songs, like we can?t sing about career opportunities anymore, we?ve got some cash.
Joe: Mark P, the leading light in the underground with the fanzine Sniffing Glue, which had become like the bible of fanzines by this time, he wrote ?punk rock died the day The Clash signed to Columbia.? And I remember thinking well, that?s nice for you, but we were never your toy to begin with. I mean, I can see his point, that we could have stayed homemade and make our own labels and stuff, which people do nowadays, but on the other hand, it needed to break out and reach America and be global, and someone had to take that bull by the horns and shake it.

THE ENGLISH PRESS CONTINUED TO HEAP CRITICISM, BUT THE CLASH NOW HAD THE CHANCE TO EXPAND THEIR TURF.

Music: English Civil War (2:35)

?ENGLISH CIVIL WAR? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1978.

COMING UP, THE CLASH UNLEASH THEIR MUSIC AND POLITICS ON THE WORLD WITH LONDON CALLING AND SANDINISTA.

I?M DELPHINE BLUE, AND YOU?RE LISTENING TO ?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK.?

Break 1 with music bed (1:00)
WELCOME BACK TO ?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK.? I?M DELPHINE BLUE.

JOE STRUMMER.

Joe: Authority is supposedly grounded in wisdom, but I could see from a very early age that authority was only a system of control, and it didn?t have any inherent wisdom, and therefore it was non-applicable.

FILMMAKER JULIEN TEMPLE.

Julien Temple: I think the great thing about Joe?s political aspects was that he didn?t really preach that much. He made it much more seductive and exciting way to understand issues that he might have been talking about. I don?t think he liked the idea of banging people on the head and lecturing them all party politics in a straight way, you know?

AUTHOR DAVE MARSH.

Dave Marsh: They were talking about change, and they weren?t talking about they were going to change you, which was the arrogance of some of the bands of the 70?s. they were talking about if you heard them right, you were going to change you. And together you might change the world, but at the very least, you were going to change you, they were going to change them, and things had changed. And there was an honesty and openness that was the next logical step after classic rock.

Music: London Calling (3:19)

?LONDON CALLING? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1979.

AUTHOR AND FILMMAKER ANTONINO D?AMBROSIO.

Antonino D?Ambrosio: The Clash were a counter-culture movement within a counter-culture, and for that reason they were the last one standing in many ways of the punk bands, despite the efforts of their label to repackage them as new wave, and thankfully the Clash resisted that and produced London Calling, which is one of the most important albums and a very important album politically because the theme of the album is anti-nuclear. It?s about resistance to the buildup to war and the buildup of nuclear weapons. And it was also a call out against Margaret Thatcher, who became Prime Minister of England at the time, 1979-1980, and Ronald Reagan, who became President of the United States.

JOE STRUMMER, MICK JONES AND DRUMMER TOPPER HEADON OF THE CLASH.

Joe: Many say that?s our finest hour, that double album London Calling, and it was done with a lot of work.
Mick: What we actually did was we recorded the whole track twice, so we recorded everything, then we overdubbed everything again, so we played along with the track so that?s how it sounds so big, like Phil Spector-ish.
Topper: It was written, rehearsed and recorded, rather than going into the studio and seeing what turned up.

AS A RESULT, THE COMBINATION OF POLITICAL IDEALS AND MUSIC ON ?LONDON CALLING? BROKE THE CLASH TO A MUCH WIDER AUDIENCE.

TOM MORELLO PLAYS GUITAR FOR RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE, A BAND THAT USED THE CLASH AS A MODEL.

Tom Morello: [4:51] Well, I mean, it was songs like?I got that record around the time that I was becoming politically aware. The issues of the day were apartheid in South Africa, they were death squads in Central America, they were the IRA hunger strikers, and then seeing the video of Joe Strummer with the H-Block t-shirt on made me want to find out what that was, and that?s where the IRA hunger strikers were, was in the H-Block prison. I was like, ?that is ballsy to be??, it was a band that was unflinching in what they were saying, and in how they were playing. It was completely outside of the safe norms of rock & roll. It really, as opposed to?prior to that I was a big fan of Kiss and Alice Cooper, and that seemed dangerous to me, but I was like no this is really dangerous.

Music: Spanish Bombs (3:18)

?SPANISH BOMBS? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1979.

YOU?RE LISTENING TO ?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK.? I?M DELPHINE BLUE.

BY 1980, THE CLASH WERE TOURING AROUND THE WORLD, AND THEIR POLITICAL MESSAGE BECAME MORE UNIVERSAL.

AUTHOR ANTONINO D?AMBROSIO CALLS IT ?PERMANENT REVOLUTION.?

Antonino D?Ambrosio: The idea and concept behind permanent revolution really comes from something Joe Strummer imbued in the music of the Clash, which was that you need constant questioning of the current system to develop a new system. It?s kind of a very sophisticated approach to democracy, in that what good art does, in this case what music does, is that it always creates a level of critical thinking, pushing the community or society forward, and that should never stop, and that?s the idea of permanent revolution. The revolution is always in place, the questioning is always in place. There?s never a point at which we say we?ve succeeded, cause there?s always something that needs to be challenged and changed and improved in a democratic society.

RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE GUITARIST TOM MORELLO.

Tom Morello: [7:18] Yeah, well, the thing that turned me on to The Clash, in addition to their music, were the politics in the lyrics and Joe Strummer?s conviction, and him as a lyricist. I just couldn?t believe it, that someone was singing about these things that mattered, and I immediately got all of?the entire Clash catalog, and whether it was an international world view on something like safe European home, or Spanish bombs, or Clampdown?like, there?s a line in Clampdown, ?You grow up and you calm down?, and I remember that lyric and I was like, ?That?s never going to be me?. And then the song White Riot was, the lyric about the??Are you taking over, are you taking orders? Are you going backwards, are you going forwards??. I wrote those four lines down and I put them on my refrigerator at college, I looked at them everyday and I asked myself those four questions everyday. Still in my head, I kind of do?

Music: Clampdown (3:49)

?CLAMPDOWN? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH.

AFTER A LONG TOUR IN SUPPORT OF ?LONDON CALLING,? THE CLASH WENT RIGHT BACK INTO THE STUDIO. CREATIVE IDEAS POURED OUT OF THEM, AND THE RESULT WAS THE TRIPLE ALBUM ?SANDINISTA!?

JOE STRUMMER.

Joe: As soon as they got a rough mix down, we cried ?fresh tape on the reel, let?s get the mics out, cause we?re gonna go like this and this and this? and we?d just keep doing that day and night. And that?s why it had to be a triple album, even though it would have been better as a double album or a single album or as an ep, who knows? The fact is that we recorded all that music in one spot in one moment, in one 3 week blast, for better or for worse. That?s the document of what happened.

NAMED FOR THE GUERRILLA GROUP THAT OVERTHREW NICARAGUAN DICTATOR SAMOSA IN 1979, ?SANDINISTA!? REFLECTED THE MUSIC AND IDEAS THEY HAD ABSORBED AROUND THE WORLD.

MICK JONES.

Mick: There was a point where punk was going narrower and narrower in terms of what it could achieve and where it could go, getting so they sort of painted themselves into a corner. We thought we could do any kind of music.

JOE STRUMMER.

Joe: No one in the group freaked if someone had come in and gone ?let?s play this with balalaikas.? Everyone would have gone ?give me the biggest balalaika!? We were open about stuff. Musicians were dropping in from all over New York, and we were in there day and night. I never went to a bar or nightclub or anything. We were in there day and night, and I used to sleep under the piano, and we just churned it out in three weeks. You couldn?t get us out of the studio if you tried.

Music: Magnificent Seven (5:33)

?THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1980.

IN A MINUTE, THE CLASH CONTINUE EXPERIMENTING WITH NEW SOUNDS. I?M DELPHINE BLUE, AND YOU?RE LISTENING TO ?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK.?

Break 2 with music bed (1:00)

WELCOME BACK TO ?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK.? I?M DELPHINE BLUE.

AFTER LONG NEGOTIATIONS, THE RECORD COMPANY AGREED TO RELEASE ?SANDINISTA!? AS A TRIPLE ALBUM, BUT PRICED AS A SINGLE. THE CLASH WANTED IT TO BE MORE EASILY ACCESSIBLE AND AFFORDABLE, SO THEY TOOK RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY LOSS OF MONEY.

MICK JONES.

Mick: Sandinista I always thought was like a record for people on oil rigs or Arctic stations, you know where you?re not able to get to the record shops regularly, and so they had something long to listen to, although you don?t have to listen to it all at once.

Music: Police On My Back (3:17)

?POLICE ON MY BACK? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1980.

JOE STRUMMER.

Joe: In 1980, we started putting the funk into the rock, and that again was Mick Jones bringing in the new sound of New York and stuff, and Simo with his reggae thing and me with my rhythm and blues thing and Topper with all his soul chops, and we could just do that.

AUTHOR AND FILMMAKER ANTONIO D?AMBROSIO HEARS THE EMERGENCE OF A NEW GENRE IN ?SANDINISTA!?

Antonino D?Ambrosio: If you look at that record (Sandinista), that really pointed to the way where music internationally was headed, because in some ways you could say that the Clash, even though they destroyed labels and were genreless in their approach to music, it pointed the way to world music.

MICK JONES AND JOE STRUMMER FOUND INSPIRATION EVERYWHERE.

Mick: We always took on music that was going on around us and made it part of our thing.
Joe: Mick Jones is the one, again he?s like the klinger? engine, he was always looking for the new thing, and that was really happening in New York. Rap was there, this is 1980, rap was going off big time, coming out of Kurtis Blow, Sugar Hill and all this.
Mick: I was so far gone with it, the others started calling me whack-attack, you know I was going around with a beat box.
Joe: WBLS was blasting all over the city, and we just got hooked on to that vibe and made our own version of it. We made an instrumental mix of Mag 7, and WBLS played it to death. You couldn?t go anywhere that summer without hearing that, and that was us weirdo punk white guys doing the kit (laughs).

Music: Know Your Rights (3:41)

?KNOW YOUR RIGHTS? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1982.

AFTER THE SPRAWLING THREE DISC ?SANDINISTA!,? THE CLASH RETURNED TO THEIR ROCK ROOTS, BUT NOT IN THE SAME WAY.

AUTHOR ANTONINO D?AMBROSIO.

Antonino D?Ambrosio: In some ways, they went backwards to go forwards with Combat Rock, cause in many ways it is a pure rock and roll album, but then they have a collaboration with Allen Ginsburg, or they have this very very interesting, almost reggae inflected song Ghetto Defendant, which is a song about class and about mistreatment of the poor, where the only alternatives is to end up in prison or part of and institution that they?re monitored by.

THEY HAD THE FIRST BIG HIT OF THEIR CAREER WITH ?ROCK THE CASBAH.? GUITARIST TOM MORELLO HAD BEEN A FAN OF THE CLASH BEFORE THEIR SUCCESS.

Tom Morello: [24:35] I mean, there was a little bit of a?When The Clash became really big on the last Mick Jones record, on ?Combat Rock?. I mean there was a little bit of possessiveness in that the?when the girls wearing 6 Izod shirts were singing along to ?Rock The Kasbah? I mean I chafed a little bit. But at the same time, I had inherited the belief that this music shouldn?t be elitist. You know, and the same lesson carried right over into Rage Against the Machine. We were not going to exclude people based on who they were. We were going to include them in the hopes of what they might become. You know, and that was really a lesson that I learned from The Clash.

Antonino D?Ambrosio: But even with the pop hit Rock the Casbah, the song is a very sophisticated song about freedom of expression, and the song has unfortunately been misused by both Bush 1 and Bush 2 in both Iraq Wars. The song was used as they bombed Baghdad.

Music: Rock the Casbah (3:14)

?ROCK THE CASBAH? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1982.

YOU?RE LISTENING TO ?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK.? I?M DELPHINE BLUE.

BY 1982, DRUGS AND ATTITUDE HAD CAUSED SOME RIFTS IN THE BAND.

Joe: Combat Rock went top 5 in America, and this is unheard of for us, our placings had been 198, or below that. And suddenly, it all blew up and everybody seemed to want to know or control or grab the steering wheel and steer the boat.

SINGER JOE STRUMMER.

Joe: We were just so tired. Tired of each other, tired of the road, tired of the studio. We were burned out. It just blew us apart and the whole thing, it was flogging a dead horse and the horse died and that was the end of that.

DRUMMER TOPPER HEADON WAS FIRED IN 1982.

RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE GUITARIST TOM MORELLO.

Tom Morello: (22:00) . And when they kicked Topper out of the band that was the death knell of the band. It wasn?t when Mick left. Because you can get a better drummer, or a more sober drummer, but there is an intangible thing when four people play together that when it?s great and it?s greater than the sum of it?s parts, no matter how talented those individual parts may be, that it is irreplaceable and don?t mess with it. And that is a lesson that a lot of bands have to learn the hard way, and The Clash was one of them.

WITHIN A YEAR, GUITARIST MICK JONES WAS FIRED AS WELL. STRUMMER AND SIMONON BROUGHT ON MUSICIANS FOR THE CLASH?S FINAL ALBUM.

Music: This is England (3:30)

?THIS IS ENGLAND? PERFORMED BY THE CLASH IN 1985.

Music (under): Revolution Rock

Antonino D?Ambrosio: You can never let that sense of hope and that sense of that things can be better, and that sense of there?s a community that shares your belief and the ideas of what a better world can be, you can never let the system or the things that are happening take that away from you.

IN THE FIVE YEARS THAT THE ORIGINAL CLASH WORKED TOGETHER, THEY CREATED A BODY OF MUSIC AND IDEAS THAT INFLUENCED ARTISTS AND LISTENERS.

Tom Morello: [12:12] Is that we are historical agents and history is not a stuffy set of facts that is done by kings and queens and presidents, but it is what we do and we have a role in shaping what tomorrow is. And that is a pretty heavy lesson for a rock & roll band to teach you.

GUITARIST TOM MORELLO OF RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE INDUCTED THE CLASH INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME.

Tom Morello: (36:30) If there is one thing that I remember from the speech that I can?like, how band chemistry matters in ways that may not be obvious, and The Clash is a perfect example of that, where you had Mick Jones who was the tunesmith and he took those great Joe Strummer lyrics and made them into great songs. Then there was Paul who infused the band with the audacious notion that a bunch of white punks could play reggae. That was?that?s happened a lot since?that was Paul?s idea. That?s when that began, when that guy brought that influence into the band. As well as being an artist. The Clash?s name came from Paul, The Clash?s logo and all of that?the clothing and the things that we identify visually with The Clash came from Paul, which is a huge part of it. Then there?s Topper, who I think that the band never could have navigated the myriad of styles?never could have mastered the styles and the genre that The Clash effortlessly flowed between without his great drumming, and then standing at the heart, at the center of The Clash was its beating heart which was Joe Strummer, and he was absolutely a guy that walked it like he talked it, and was?he was a person who was as righteous as his lyrics and he brought that?an honesty and a poetic subtlety and humor and righteous indignation to music that I?it certainly occupies a very unique and singular voice in the history or rock vocals.

?THE CLASH: REVOLUTION ROCK? WAS PRODUCED BY JOYRIDE MEDIA. PAUL CHUFFO AND JOSHUA JACKSON ARE THE PRODUCERS.

OUR EXECUTIVE PRODUCER IS JOHN VERNILE.

ALL SONGS ON THIS PROGRAM CAN BE FOUND ON THE COLUMBIA LEGACY CDS ?THE CLASH?, ?GIVE ?EM ENOUGH ROPE?, ?LONDON CALLING?, ?SANDINISTA!?, ?COMBAT ROCK? AND ?CUT THE CRAP.?

SPECIAL THANKS GO TO ADAM BLOCK, LISA BUCKLER, TOM CORDING, STEVE BERKOWITZ, ERIC MOLK, SHANNON MUELLER, ANDY CAHN, NADINE NASSAR, PATRICIA SIMONON AND DON LETTS.

I?M DELPHINE BLUE, AND THANKS FOR LISTENING.

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