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Stencil Pirates

From: Adam Allington
Length: 03:50

Street artist Josh McPhee talks about the versitility of stenciling Read the full description.

Sfuhaifllng_small Josh McPhee, a Chicago-based street artist and Author of "Stencil Pirates" took time to speak with me after a lecture in Portland, Maine. Stencils, unlike traditional hip-hop graffiti are quick and easy ways to pepper an urban landscape with messages. They often employ a certain base language--a picture and text. Most often people can't help but read and absorb the message as they walk by. Mcphee points out that street art, unlike art in galleries reaches a wider cross section of people for whom art may not be a part of their daily lives.

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Piece Description

Josh McPhee, a Chicago-based street artist and Author of "Stencil Pirates" took time to speak with me after a lecture in Portland, Maine. Stencils, unlike traditional hip-hop graffiti are quick and easy ways to pepper an urban landscape with messages. They often employ a certain base language--a picture and text. Most often people can't help but read and absorb the message as they walk by. Mcphee points out that street art, unlike art in galleries reaches a wider cross section of people for whom art may not be a part of their daily lives.

5 Comments Atom Feed

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Review of Stencil Pirates

A well put together piece about a well spoken artist. This should definitely find its way into any program about street art.

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Review of Stencil Pirates

This piece is well edited and of good sound quality.

Though I did not agree with most of this artist’s ideas, I was very interested to hear how he explains his work. There were several obvious questions that I wanted to hear him answer. What ideas are you trying to communicate through your art? Do you believe most people appreciate your creations as ‘art’? How do you explain the damage to public property?

I’ve said this in other venues before, but I think this is why the “narrator-less” format is tricky for me as a listener. I’m never sure what the guest was asked and that makes interpreting his comments a challenge. I often find I have a lot of questions in my mind that I want to ask when it’s all over.

What I liked about this piece was the artists comments about how he brings art into everyday life and helps to change the perception that it’s only for certain people. I also liked the idea that it communicates its message as soon as it’s seen.

With a good lead in and lead out (provided by a host) I think some listeners would appreciate this piece.

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Review of Stencil Pirates

Spray paint cans -- love the sound! I could listen to this alone for a few minutes straight. Throw a pretty cool monologue about the power of graffiti art on top of that, a rogue life lesson, the frustration of an artist struggling to find a medium, then finding one (the streets) that is regulated. If you like a view from the vibrant, anarchistic, non-commercial crowd, or if you want a piece to attract that crowd, go for this.

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Musical Works

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Related Website

http://www.stencilarchive.org