Piece image

An Interview with Dan Hoyle

From: Leah Welborn
Length: 11:56

Talking with Dan Hoyle, theatrical journalist and creator of 'Tings Dey Happen,' currently in its extended sold-out engagement in San Francisco. Read the full description.

Tingpic_small Dan Hoyle's show 'Tings Dey Happen' was supposed to run at San Francisco's Marsh Theatre for three weeks, ending in early January. But it keeps selling out every weekend, so The Marsh just keeps it extending it - at this point, at least through April. You wouldn't think that would necessarily be the case for a one man tour de force about the madness of Nigerian oil politics. Dan's an unassuming presence off stage. He's a very gentle looking young man in his mid-twenties, and he wears black framed Ira Glass-style glasses. Speaking metaphorically, Dan Hoyle's not in his show at all. He puts the audience in his place as observer, and becomes the characters he encountered during his year in Nigeria as a Fulbright scholar. CNN's Jeff Koinange recently produced a dramatic segment about the violent militias in the Nigerian Delta. The men he met were dressed in black and wore ski masks. They were armed to the teeth and they had recently kidnapped two dozen Filipino oil workers who were presented to the cameras as proof. The hostages have since been released - and that's not always the case. These are the groups that Dan Hoyle lived among and studied for a year. These are the people he becomes during our conversation.

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Piece Description

Dan Hoyle's show 'Tings Dey Happen' was supposed to run at San Francisco's Marsh Theatre for three weeks, ending in early January. But it keeps selling out every weekend, so The Marsh just keeps it extending it - at this point, at least through April. You wouldn't think that would necessarily be the case for a one man tour de force about the madness of Nigerian oil politics. Dan's an unassuming presence off stage. He's a very gentle looking young man in his mid-twenties, and he wears black framed Ira Glass-style glasses. Speaking metaphorically, Dan Hoyle's not in his show at all. He puts the audience in his place as observer, and becomes the characters he encountered during his year in Nigeria as a Fulbright scholar. CNN's Jeff Koinange recently produced a dramatic segment about the violent militias in the Nigerian Delta. The men he met were dressed in black and wore ski masks. They were armed to the teeth and they had recently kidnapped two dozen Filipino oil workers who were presented to the cameras as proof. The hostages have since been released - and that's not always the case. These are the groups that Dan Hoyle lived among and studied for a year. These are the people he becomes during our conversation.

Related Website

http://web.mac.com/story52