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"109 on 9/11"

From: Esther Regelson
Length: 58:29

"109 on 9-11" tells the tale of 109 Washington Street, a tenement building located two-and-a-half blocks south of the World Trade Center. Read the full description.

Default-piece-image-2 109 On 9-11 SYNOPSIS "109 on 9-11" tells the tale of 109 Washington Street, a tenement building located two-and-a-half blocks south of the World Trade Center. Nine residents relate their stories from the mundane (finding a decent laundromat in the Wall Street area) to the extreme (finding a hiding place as the South Tower collapses). Hear Eddie Metropolis, apartment # 13, lifetime resident, talk about the morphing of Lower Manhattan from Little Moravia (a working class immigrant neighborhood) to a ghost town in the shadow of the financial district. To quote Eddie: "I’ve seen the Trade Center being built, now I’ve seen it all destroyed." The other tenants narrate equally descriptive tales: - Jim Pedersen, apartment 9: the horror of a front door that won’t open as the South Tower collapses. - Roxanne Yamashiro, apartment 10: what it felt like being trapped on the subway underneath the twin towers. - Nancy Keegan, apartment 1: walking seven miles with a dog and cat—just to get to a place to sleep for the night. - Lesley McBurney, apartment 7: on the guilt of leaving behind two cats. - Erwin Silverstein, apartment 6, witnesses fallen bodies…and then goes to work. - Flavio Rizzo and Veruska Cantelli, apartment 15, play back for us frantic answering machine messages from Italy and elsewhere. "109 on 9-11", first and foremost, demonstrates how the September 11th tragedy helped transform a building. Conducted in the months following the disaster, these interviews capture the fear and trauma that forced these once-anonymous apartment dwellers to turn to one another for help and solace. Today, 109 Washington Street has become a closely-knit group of concerned friends and neighbors. The program closes one year later, on September 11, 2002, with a rooftop chamber concert, led by professional cellist, Jim Pederson (apartment 9). This story was distributed in August/September of 2003 by PRI, and was aired on approximately 30 stations nationwide.

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Piece Description

109 On 9-11 SYNOPSIS "109 on 9-11" tells the tale of 109 Washington Street, a tenement building located two-and-a-half blocks south of the World Trade Center. Nine residents relate their stories from the mundane (finding a decent laundromat in the Wall Street area) to the extreme (finding a hiding place as the South Tower collapses). Hear Eddie Metropolis, apartment # 13, lifetime resident, talk about the morphing of Lower Manhattan from Little Moravia (a working class immigrant neighborhood) to a ghost town in the shadow of the financial district. To quote Eddie: "I’ve seen the Trade Center being built, now I’ve seen it all destroyed." The other tenants narrate equally descriptive tales: - Jim Pedersen, apartment 9: the horror of a front door that won’t open as the South Tower collapses. - Roxanne Yamashiro, apartment 10: what it felt like being trapped on the subway underneath the twin towers. - Nancy Keegan, apartment 1: walking seven miles with a dog and cat—just to get to a place to sleep for the night. - Lesley McBurney, apartment 7: on the guilt of leaving behind two cats. - Erwin Silverstein, apartment 6, witnesses fallen bodies…and then goes to work. - Flavio Rizzo and Veruska Cantelli, apartment 15, play back for us frantic answering machine messages from Italy and elsewhere. "109 on 9-11", first and foremost, demonstrates how the September 11th tragedy helped transform a building. Conducted in the months following the disaster, these interviews capture the fear and trauma that forced these once-anonymous apartment dwellers to turn to one another for help and solace. Today, 109 Washington Street has become a closely-knit group of concerned friends and neighbors. The program closes one year later, on September 11, 2002, with a rooftop chamber concert, led by professional cellist, Jim Pederson (apartment 9). This story was distributed in August/September of 2003 by PRI, and was aired on approximately 30 stations nationwide.

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Review of "109 on 9/11"

An excellent look at a tragic day from the view of those living so close to the world trade center. It reflects how neighbors grew close through suffering the events of 9/11.

Good use of minimal music; when used it captured the sobriety of the thoughts.

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Review of "109 on 9-11"

Humane (as in compassionate) and intimate conversations with New Yorkers who were two blocks away from the Twin Towers on 9/11. These accounts let you vicariously experience the devastating events of that day. These common every day neighbors relate their extraordinary and heroic responses to this terrible events. Dignity and love shines through this narrative.

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Review of "109 on 9-11"

Friends who live in lower Manhattan have given me heart-stopping renditions of their experience of 9/11. Still, these voices from 109 Washington, a couple of blocks from the World Trade Center, knocked me for a loop, put my stomach in a knot, brought tears to my eyes. The first segment sets the scene from a neighborhood point of view. We get a sense of how things were before the towers existed, and a feel for what it was like living in their shadow. The narrator, who lives in 109, acquaints us with the other eight in a relaxed, friendly, downright neighborly way. We get to know their voices, and a little about them and how they came to live at such an odd outpost from normal Manhattan life. We hear about their morning activities the morning of September 11, and the surreal quality of all that followed the very loud sound that drew them to their windows, onto fire escapes, down to the street. One man, speaking of the north tower, describes it as looking like “a garden torch and somebody had lit the upper part of it. And I don’t think anyone thought the tower would fall or anything else would happen.” Some residents clung together, or found each other through the dust. Eddie, from apartment 13, was already at work in New Jersey, unsure whether his building was still standing. One of the women, Lesley, from 7, I believe, describes being on the street when the second building fell, turning to see “a rolling wall of solid debris...and you didn’t know if it was going to reach you.” It’s wonderful to have an audio oral history from a diverse mix of humans who that day shared a street address, and now share an experience beyond imagining. There’s a books worth of detail contained in this hour of woven voice. The plaintive sounds of the rooftop chamber concert the cellist in apartment 9 organized a year later are used sparingly, but to good effect. While this is not the most highly polished production, that somehow feels just right. It’s beautifully put together and a valuable, moving way to remember that day in New York, this or any year.

Broadcast History

This piece was distributed by PRI in 2003, and was broadcast on approximately 30 stations nationwide.

Transcript

109 on 9-11

Jack Cadwallader: You’re listening to "109 on 9-11. My name is Jack Cadwallader. The interviews you’re about to hear were conducted a few months after September 11th, 2001.

----PATH Train Announcement----

Jack Cadwallader: That is the sound of a ghost. It is the sound heard inside the World Trade Center before 9-11.

----Sounds of escalator squeaks; carts rolling by; voices; footsteps; subway entrance----

PATH train announcements, escalators squeaking, subway turnstiles turning – Workers would hear these sounds on their way to and from work. But what if the World Trade Center wasn’t your place of business? What if it was your backyard? What if you constantly heard these sounds on your way to breakfast? Or while shopping? Or if you were just cutting through the mall to go see a friend up the road? For them, or us, these were the sounds of our neighborhood – th...
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Timing and Cues

TITLE: "109 ON 9-11"

PROGRAM LENGTH: 58:33 minutes

TIMINGS & CUES

00:00:00 INCUE: "This is "109 on 9-11…"

00:18:13 OUTCUE: "…My name is Jack Cadwallader."

(30 SECOND MUSIC BED FOR ID)

00:18:45 INCUE: "That morning, I heard something…"

00:41:27 OUTCUE: "…at Earthlink, dot net."

(30 SECOND MUSIC BED FOR ID)

00:41:58 INCUE: "Jack calls me "the Grey Ghost…"

00:58:33 OUTCUE: "…at earthlink.net."

Additional Files

Related Website

http://estjack@earthlink.net (e-mail address)