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Timber! The Aftermath of the Washington Logging Collapse

From: Jessica Roberts
Length: 18:14

What happens after an industry collapses?

Dsc01267_small In the last 4 years, over seven and a half million people across the country lost their jobs in mass lay-offs. Big lay-offs of this nature, like when a steel mill or auto plant closes, can cause emotional and economic turmoil in the communities where they happen, but what are the long-term effects on the people who lose their jobs? Jessica Roberts grew up in Grays Harbor County in Southwest Washington State, a community familiar with lay-offs and plant closings. In the early 1990s the timber industry that had supported the area for almost 200 years began to collapse and the area?s unemployment rate skyrocketed. Recently, Jessica returned home to talk with the loggers and mill workers who lost their jobs a decade ago, and see how they are now.

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Piece Description

In the last 4 years, over seven and a half million people across the country lost their jobs in mass lay-offs. Big lay-offs of this nature, like when a steel mill or auto plant closes, can cause emotional and economic turmoil in the communities where they happen, but what are the long-term effects on the people who lose their jobs? Jessica Roberts grew up in Grays Harbor County in Southwest Washington State, a community familiar with lay-offs and plant closings. In the early 1990s the timber industry that had supported the area for almost 200 years began to collapse and the area?s unemployment rate skyrocketed. Recently, Jessica returned home to talk with the loggers and mill workers who lost their jobs a decade ago, and see how they are now.

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Review of Timber! The Aftermath of the Washington Logging Collapse

Jessica's feature was a story of a specific locale with obvious universal connections about the personal side of changing economies. That attracted me and I wanted to know how this particular work force would adapt...or not.

The stories were intimate, real, personal but some of the audio was a bit hissy and muddy. I liked the report but think it could be edited substantially. Some nat sound could have enhanced the progression while creating a very real location in the theater of my mind.

Jessica, having lived there, brought a unique perspective to the story without undermining the report or overshadowing the stories of the workers.