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Power Poses: Are They Ultimately Good or Bad?

From: Robert Frederick
Series: The Conjectural
Length: 04:42

Striking a power pose--standing like a superhero--may boost your confidence and get you short-term gains. But scientists don't yet know if, or when, such short-term gains lead to long-term benefits.

Pp-wonderwoman_small Striking a power pose--standing like a superhero--may boost your confidence and get you short-term gains. But scientists don't yet know if, or when, such short-term gains lead to long-term benefits.

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Piece Description

Transcript

Reporter: Robert Frederick
The nervousness most people get a few minutes before, say, a job interview can be squashed—at least a little bit—by standing like a superhero. Scientists already know that striking such power poses causes your body’s testosterone levels to go up—so you feel more powerful—and your cortisol levels to go down—so you feel less stressed. Overall, that makes you feel more confident. But what scientists don’t yet know about getting confidence from power poses, says cognitive psychologist Eric Stone of Wake Forest University…

Interviewee: Eric Stone
Is confidence good or bad when that confidence is not justified by actual knowledge? And if it depends, what does it depend on?

Reporter: Robert Frederick
Indeed, suppose the job you’re interviewing for is beyond what you actually know how to do. But, you apply anyway because it comes with a great salary and benefits. Yo...
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Intro and Outro

INTRO:

Have you ever taken two minutes to stand like a superhero: with fists on hips, elbows out, and legs at least shoulder-width apart? Scientists say striking such “power poses” do make you feel more powerful and so more confident. But as freelance journalist Robert Frederick reports, researchers still don’t know if that kind of confidence is good or bad for you—ultimately— particularly when that confidence is misplaced.

OUTRO:

Robert Frederick is a freelance science reporter. Find him at TheConjectural.com.

Musical Works

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Related Website

http://www.TheConjectural.com