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14 Fueling Your Car With Leftovers

From: Pat Maxwell
Series: November 2006 - Isla Earth Radio Series
Length: 01:34

Leftovers could make a significant contribution to the future of alternative energy. Read the full description.

Photoscollage_small As oil and gasoline get more expensive, people are considering biodiesel as an alternative fuel. And something that you may be avoiding in your diet could become an important source of biodiesel: Animal fat. Tallow, or rendered animal fat, is cheaper than oil. In Brazil and Australia, tallow is being tapped for diesel engines and plant boilers. And Tyson Foods, the Arkansas chicken processor, uses tallow to power its boilers and the trucks in the company?s fleet. Large quantities of tallow are left over when beef cattle are processed, and it contains lots of energy. In the 1970s, researcher Ralph Sims demonstrated that it?s relatively easy and cheap to refine tallow so that it can be used in engines. The world produces 100 million metric tons of fats and oils. Most of it is used for human consumption, but the leftovers could make a significant contribution to the future of alternative energy.

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Also in the November 2006 - Isla Earth Radio Series series

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01 The Green Reaper (01:33)
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02 Medical Mysteries from the Deep (01:34)
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03 Fog Catchers in the Sky (01:34)
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Chilean researchers devised a plan to capture water from the thick fog that rolled in daily from the sea.
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04 Scrape, Don't Rinse (01:34)
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Here?s a surprise: An efficient automatic dishwasher will use less water than hand-washing those same dishes.
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05 Leaves of Three... (01:34)
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06 An Eco-Friendly Auto Club (01:34)
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Planning your next vacation just got a lot greener.
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07 Keeping Plastic Out of the Ocean (01:34)
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Many kinds of plastic are forever, or nearly so.
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08 Deconstruction Preserves Building Materials (01:34)
From: Pat Maxwell

Today, there?s a new trend in the building industry called ?deconstruction.?
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09 What Does Organic Mean? (01:34)
From: Pat Maxwell

When you?re shopping for food, how do you know if it?s really organic?
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10 There's Genes in That Dirt (01:34)
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Piece Description

As oil and gasoline get more expensive, people are considering biodiesel as an alternative fuel. And something that you may be avoiding in your diet could become an important source of biodiesel: Animal fat. Tallow, or rendered animal fat, is cheaper than oil. In Brazil and Australia, tallow is being tapped for diesel engines and plant boilers. And Tyson Foods, the Arkansas chicken processor, uses tallow to power its boilers and the trucks in the company?s fleet. Large quantities of tallow are left over when beef cattle are processed, and it contains lots of energy. In the 1970s, researcher Ralph Sims demonstrated that it?s relatively easy and cheap to refine tallow so that it can be used in engines. The world produces 100 million metric tons of fats and oils. Most of it is used for human consumption, but the leftovers could make a significant contribution to the future of alternative energy.

Related Website

http://www.islaearth.org