We're working on a new version of PRX. Want a sneak peek?

Caption: PRX default Piece image
PRX default Piece image 

Part 2: Judge Rules Suspension Justified

From: Vermont Public Radio
Series: When Student Suspension Becomes Controversial
Length: 02:56

Vermont Public Radio examines the circumstances surrounding the suspension of an African-American senior on allegations he intruded into other student rooms at Middlebury College. The senior sued the college to get his diploma and said that race was involved in his suspension. A Vermont court later ruled in favor of the college.

Default-piece-image-1 Vermont Public Radio's Nina (NY-nah) Keck reported on the controversial suspension of an African-American senior, O'Neil Walker, at Middlebury College in July of 2005. College administrators said 21-year-old Walker seriously violated the school's behavior code by allegedly intruding into the room of another student. Walker, a scholarship student from the Bronx, says he was unfairly charged; he took the school to court to try to get his diploma. Keck followed up on this story in November of 2005, reporting that an Addison Superior Court Judge ruled that Middlebury had the right to suspend Walker. The court stated that its function was not to reweigh the evidence or redecide Walker's guilt or innocence, but instead to ensure that Walker had been given the opportunity to present evidence to his defense. Walker dropped his charges that the college's actions were racially motivated. Vermont Public Radio received a national Edward R. Murrow award for Nina Keck's investigative reporting in the small market radio category for these stories. NOTE: Host intros must be included. They're provided under Information for Stations.

To hear the full audio, sign up for a free PRX account or log in.

Piece Description

Vermont Public Radio's Nina (NY-nah) Keck reported on the controversial suspension of an African-American senior, O'Neil Walker, at Middlebury College in July of 2005. College administrators said 21-year-old Walker seriously violated the school's behavior code by allegedly intruding into the room of another student. Walker, a scholarship student from the Bronx, says he was unfairly charged; he took the school to court to try to get his diploma. Keck followed up on this story in November of 2005, reporting that an Addison Superior Court Judge ruled that Middlebury had the right to suspend Walker. The court stated that its function was not to reweigh the evidence or redecide Walker's guilt or innocence, but instead to ensure that Walker had been given the opportunity to present evidence to his defense. Walker dropped his charges that the college's actions were racially motivated. Vermont Public Radio received a national Edward R. Murrow award for Nina Keck's investigative reporting in the small market radio category for these stories. NOTE: Host intros must be included. They're provided under Information for Stations.

Timing and Cues

(Host intro)
Racial controversies are not uncommon at colleges and universities in the U.S. A Superior Judge in Addison, VT ruled that Middlebury College had the right to suspend an African-American senior for allegedly intruding into the room of another student. Vermont Public Radio's Nina (NY-nah) Keck has more.

(The total running time is 00:08:19, host intro and outro included.)

Related Website

http://www.vpr.net