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Food Sleuth Radio, Mark Kopecky Interview

From: Dan Hemmelgarn
Series: Food Sleuth Radio
Length: 28:00

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Soil. We treat it like dirt, yet it holds vibrant communities of microscopic organisms that affect public health. Join Food Sleuth Radio host and Registered Dietitian, Melinda Hemmelgarn, for her interview with Mark Kopecky, Soils Agronomist for Organic Valley/CROPP Cooperative. Kopecky describes the wonders beneath our feet that ultimately affect the nutritional quality of our food, and connects the dots between soil, plant, animal and human health. Read the full description.

Food_sleuth_on_kopn_small Soil. We treat it like dirt, yet it holds vibrant communities of microscopic organisms that affect public health. Join Food Sleuth Radio host and Registered Dietitian, Melinda Hemmelgarn, for her interview with Mark Kopecky, Soils Agronomist for Organic Valley/CROPP Cooperative. Kopecky describes the wonders beneath our feet that ultimately affect the nutritional quality of our food, and connects the dots between soil, plant, animal and human health.

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Additional Credits

Theme music: Kevin McLeod

Related Website

www.organicvalley.coop