Caption: Tim and Tanya Chartier present a classic mime stance in Central Park, NYC., Credit: Ari Daniel
Image by: Ari Daniel 
Tim and Tanya Chartier present a classic mime stance in Central Park, NYC. 

Loving math and mime

From: Ari Daniel
Length: 10:54

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Tim Chartier has found a way to fuse his two great loves: math and mime. (It's a fusion that's almost as unlikely as wanting to do a radio story about it.) He and his wife strive to have their audiences become a part of the world that they're creating on stage, and in so doing, the math becomes at once understandable and unforgettable. Read the full description.

Mm02_small Tim Chartier has found a way to fuse his two great loves: math and mime. (It's a fusion that's almost as unlikely as wanting to do a radio story about it.) He and his wife strive to have their audiences become a part of the world that they're creating on stage, and in so doing, the math becomes at once understandable and unforgettable.

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Piece Description

Transcript

Ari: I have a confession to make. I love math. I minored in it in college. I would’ve taken more math classes if I could’ve fit them into my schedule. And these days, one of my favorite things to do as a reporter is to talk to people who get to love math for a living.

Chartier: It corresponds to a partial derivative – that’s telling you the rate of change.

Ari: People like Tim Chartier. He’s a mathematician at Davidson College in North Carolina. And there are two things that set this guy apart from a lot of mathematicians. First, he cares a lot about getting others to care about math.

Chartier: I really enjoy teaching those last-math-class-of-your-life classes where often a large percentage of the students really would rather not take the cla—it’s not even that. They hate math. But they have to take the class. On the first day of class, I turn to the...
Read the full transcript

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

OUTRO:

This program is part of the STEM Story Project – distributed by PRX and made possible with funds from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Musical Works

Title Artist Album Label Year Length
El Piano del Pobre Jean Freber Acordeon de Paris. Sony Music Distribution 1989 02:20

Related Website

http://www.aridanielshapiro.com