Caption:  Maricruz Jaramillo (standing) and Samoa Asigau wait for their ride back to the Charles Darwin Research Station after an early morning of catching birds in an agricultural area on Santa Cruz Island., Credit: Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio
Image by: Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio 
Maricruz Jaramillo (standing) and Samoa Asigau wait for their ride back to the Charles Darwin Research Station after an early morning of catching birds in an agricultural area on Santa Cruz Island. 

Following in Darwin's Footsteps: Two Young Women Scientists Forge Their Futures in the Galapagos

From: Veronique LaCapra
Length: 06:34

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What motivates young people to become scientists? Meet Maricruz Jaramillo and Samoa Asigau, two young women scientists from opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, whose professional aspirations have taken them to the Galapagos Islands. Science reporter Véronique LaCapra joined Mari and Samoa in the Galapagos, where they are studying a type of malaria that is affecting native bird populations there. "Following in Darwin’s Footsteps" profiles their research and personal journeys into science, and highlights the changing face of scientific research. The Galapagos Islands — Charles Darwin’s inspiration and a touchstone in the history of evolutionary biology — serve as a sound-rich backdrop.

Mari_and_samoa_prx_img_2197_small What motivates young people to become scientists? Meet Maricruz Jaramillo and Samoa Asigau, two young women scientists from opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, whose professional aspirations have taken them to the Galapagos Islands. Science reporter Véronique LaCapra joined Mari and Samoa in the Galapagos, where they are studying a type of malaria that is affecting native bird populations there. "Following in Darwin’s Footsteps" profiles their research and personal journeys into science, and highlights the changing face of scientific research. The Galapagos Islands — Charles Darwin’s inspiration and a touchstone in the history of evolutionary biology — serve as a sound-rich backdrop.

Piece Description

Broadcast History

Aired 8-1-13 on St. Louis Public Radio

Transcript

LaCapra Galapagos PRX STEM
Editors: John Biewen, John Barth

NOTE TO WEB PRODUCERS: Additional photos available on request.

HOST IN: Charles Darwin revolutionized science. His theory of evolution was based on careful observations of birds and other wildlife…in places like the Galapagos Islands.

One thing that has been really slow to evolve is the gender mix in science. Men still dominate many scientific fields…just like they did in Darwin’s day, more than 150 years ago.

But gradually, more women are breaking in. We’re going to meet up with two young women scientists in – where else? – the Galapagos. Véronique LaCapra is our guide.

(GALAPAGOS)
6:35
SOC

LACAPRA: I’m Véronique. And this is Mari.

CUT 1 MARI JARAMILLO (0:04)
“Mi nombre es Maricruz Jaramillo y soy de Quito, Ecuador.”

LACAPRA: Maricruz Jaramillo [hah-rah-ME-yo] grew up in Ecuador’s capital, Quito. But she always loved b...
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Intro and Outro

INTRO:

HOST IN: Charles Darwin revolutionized science. His theory of evolution was based on careful observations of birds and other wildlife…in places like the Galapagos Islands.

One thing that has been really slow to evolve is the gender mix in science. Men still dominate many scientific fields…just like they did in Darwin’s day, more than 150 years ago.

But gradually, more women are breaking in. We’re going to meet up with two young women scientists in – where else? – the Galapagos. Véronique LaCapra is our guide.

OUTRO:

This story was produced for the PRX STEM Story Project with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Images


Additional Credits

This story was produced for the PRX STEM Story Project with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Related Website

http://www.news.stlpublicradio.org/post/two-young-women-scientists-umsl-forge-their-futures-galapagos